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Speed is my enemy


1xsculler
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Indeed this is a challenge on narrow, crowded, steep slopes. Especially with "modern" tapered shapes that literally accelerate thru the turn. You really need to put them on edge with confidence. And add skid's in between to survice.

Or - you go back to "modern old-school" not tapered shapes that loose more speed while in the turn and finish turns more easily. That what I've done in recent years (F2 Vantage 162, F2 Axxis GTS 164)

...😎

Edited by wulf
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1 minute ago, wulf said:

Indeed this is a challenge on narrow, crowded, steep slopes. Especially with "modern" tapered shapes that literally accelerate thru the turn. You really need to put them on edge with confidence. And add skid's in between to survice.

Or - you go back to "old-school" not tapered shapes that loose more speed while in the turn and finish turns more easily. That what I've done in recent years (F2 Vantage 162, F2 Axxsi GTS 164)...😎

Very interesting!

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10 minutes ago, wulf said:

Indeed this is a challenge on narrow, crowded, steep slopes. Especially with "modern" tapered shapes that literally accelerate thru the turn. You really need to put them on edge with confidence. And add skid's in between to survice.

Or - you go back to "modern old-school" not tapered shapes that loose more speed while in the turn and finish turns more easily. That what I've done in recent years (F2 Vantage 162, F2 Axxis GTS 164)

...😎

The "new modern" boards developed by Thirst, and now Coiler Contra's, have what you're looking for. They accelerate thru the turn, but keep turning as long as you keep it on edge, yet have all the smooth ride magic of the modern raceboard. They have taper and they don't get locked into a turn like the old school single sidecuts would.

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The more I learn about board construction and performance the more I realise that the flex pattern along the length of the board is as important as sidecut shape (shape since many boards have complex curves with multiple radii) in determining the turn shape and edge hold. The higher the board is on edge, the more flex pattern contributes to the equation. 

Side cuts are easyish to describe. Is there a way of describing the flex pattern with the same level of precision? May be better as a separate thread, rather than hijacking this one.

Edited by SunSurfer
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Five years ago when the snow was good on my local resort, skidding was rare and usually applied only when you wanted to shower a wave of snow over your buddy that was waiting for you at the end of a run. My Tanker (172 cm, I think) was almost the only board I would ride. These past few years have not been good. Trails are almost always icy and their width is thin. I find myself sliding turns more than ever on diamond and some blue runs. These are runs that I would have rather died then to slide a turn. Under current conditions it is almost impossible to carve all the way down certain runs. Crowded, icy, with no width what so ever, sliding a turn is paramount.

You can always down size and instead of riding that Rad Air Tanker 172 you can get on your Volkl Renn Tiger 153 and have a day cranking slalom turns no matter the width or conditions. Granted its not the same as driving big looping GS turns but you have a better chance of not sliding a turn.

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I think the thing about this community's general disparagement of skidding and sliding isn't that skidding and sliding are "invalid"; it's that they are techniques that are applied in an inappropriately broad manner by a large portion of snowboarders. Skidding and sliding to slow down are totally valid techniques, and I do it ALL THE TIME. The issue is when skidding and sliding become your go-to technique for general maneuvering. Skids and slides are *THE* *BEST* technique for bleeding speed without a directional change and being good at it can really save your bacon.

I've found myself in situations where suddenly I have a skier on my left and a skier on my right and I want to get away from them but can't carve my way out because that would lead to a collision. Slashing away speed is the best way to deal with that and get them in front of me so that I don't have to trust them. 

I'm constantly slashing and skidding on cat-tracks to keep a predictable line and not get hit.

It's a valid technique that should be in your toolbox, just not one that you should be applying wantonly everywhere.

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I like to take a different mind set.....Speed is my friend!  

You need speed to initiate turns and speed helps transfer smoothly and quickly into the next turn.

Also my thinking is I'm more of a target just putting along.....I've found It's easier to dodge a bullet at speed

Yes speed can be  intimidating........but for me it's specific boards, not speed  that will hand you your ass and pitch you in the woods if you show the slightest  sign of fear....of speed!

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11 hours ago, queequeg said:

I think the thing about this community's general disparagement of skidding and sliding isn't that skidding and sliding are "invalid"; it's that they are techniques that are applied in an inappropriately broad manner by a large portion of snowboarders. Skidding and sliding to slow down are totally valid techniques, and I do it ALL THE TIME. The issue is when skidding and sliding become your go-to technique for general maneuvering. Skids and slides are *THE* *BEST* technique for bleeding speed without a directional change and being good at it can really save your bacon.

I've found myself in situations where suddenly I have a skier on my left and a skier on my right and I want to get away from them but can't carve my way out because that would lead to a collision. Slashing away speed is the best way to deal with that and get them in front of me so that I don't have to trust them. 

I'm constantly slashing and skidding on cat-tracks to keep a predictable line and not get hit.

It's a valid technique that should be in your toolbox, just not one that you should be applying wantonly everywhere.

Well said. I second that. In order to become a complete rider skidding, sliding, slarving is needed to have a full arsenal to encounter the slopes.

Here in the overly crowded EU resorts I do have days where I barly carved at all. So I am using the "other techniques" and still have a great day.

Boardwise: Yes there is more than just the radius. Flex pattern plays a major role too. However I found that "no-taper" shapes give me that old-school "hooky" feeling when needed. What is really fun to play with on narrow slopes.

Edited by wulf
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2 hours ago, wulf said:

In order to become a complete rider skidding, sliding, slarving is needed to have a full arsenal to encounter the slopes.

In addition to your quiver of boards you need a quiver of techniques. Learn them, ride the mountain and carve when you can.

 

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1 minute ago, Jack M said:

Remember to LOOK where you want the carve to go.  In between carves, turn your head, and look at the spot where you want the next carve to end.  Carve there.

If you're looking downhill you're doing it wrong.

 

That's been my battle. 😐  I want my riding to feel like Spiderman slinging webs down Broadway.  👍

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On 1/5/2021 at 4:25 PM, west carven said:

howdy

we need a video of you... we would have a better idea of what we could suggest...

turning scrubs speed... are you really carving?...

Am I really carving...not much. No way am I going to post a vid of me skidding back and forth down the hill. It would serve no purpose as I already know what I MUST do, i.e. discipline myself to get up on my edge and hang on to it until it’s time to roll on to the other edge. I know we all have to skid from time to time. I can deal with that and feel good about it. 
I know what well carved, linked-up , C-shaped turns feel like and I know what the track looks like as I could do it in 2005. No, I wasn’t very good but when all conditions were conducive to pure carving I could at least do it. 
I’ll keep banging it out until I get that feel back and can get my knees, heelside and toeside, within a foot of the snow. 
If I had some good carver to follow down the slopes I have at my disposal it would make a huge difference as during the past four years I have followed one or two guys for a couple of turns and I could come close to imitating them. 

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8 hours ago, Jack M said:

Remember to LOOK where you want the carve to go.  In between carves, turn your head, and look at the spot where you want the next carve to end.  Carve there.

If you're looking downhill you're doing it wrong.

No truer words. 

After years of 'technique building', this little piece of wisdom has been far and away the most meaningful. 

Don't get me wrong, I still stuck at this. But I suck with waaaaaay more style and finesse. 

Edited by MNSurfer
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