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Corey

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Corey last won the day on June 22

Corey had the most liked content!

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  • Location
    near Winnipeg, MB, Canada
  • Home Mountain/Resort?
    Home: Asessippi, Favorite: Aspen
  • Occupation?
    Mechanical Engineer
  • Current Boards in your Quiver
    Coiler: Angry 160, VSR 167, EX 175
    Donek: 164 MK variant, Proteus 170, Rev 163
  • Current Boots Used?
    UPZ RC-10 with FinTec heels
  • Current bindings and set-up?
    Bomber TD3 Sidewinders
  • Snowboarding since
    1987
  • Hardbooting since
    2004

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  1. And hand the tail of the board first as it's thinner when they're measuring it.
  2. Years ago I was riding with Mr. Knapton, we were stopped and waiting for a clearing. After one racer guy buzzed way too close to our group, he got up and started flailing like he was fighting for balance. All of the others gave a WIDE berth around us. Simply brilliant! Moral: Look out of control to be safer?
  3. That's LOW level in your world? Damn. Don't get me wrong, that's awesome! But you have to recognize that you're in the slim minority.
  4. Be careful with how much policing you want. If you look at an average ski slope with a critical eye, 99.9% of users go roughly straight down the hill, with few paths crossing. Then there are a tiny % of users that dart and dodge all over the place, weaving back and forth at high accelerations. Collisions can only happen when paths intersect. So it's simple: Paint lanes down the run, mandate turn signals, and ban turning. This is said tongue-in-cheek, but I had a ski patroller tell me that I "came into his lane" years ago. Everyone is confident that their ideas are correct and it's everyone else that's the problem.
  5. Make sure you have nice rounded inside corners like @Wolf has shown above. This greatly reduces stress concentration - meaning it'll reduce the chances of a crack starting. The worst possible thing you can do is use a hacksaw or cut-off wheel and leave a sharp notch at the end of the cut. Round dremel or files are much preferred to finish the surface.
  6. Other random thing: I molded mine with a super thin pantyhose-style sock, then ride with medium to thick socks so it fits a tiny bit tighter.
  7. I run the Alpine liners. They're firm enough to hold my foot but don't affect boot flex very much. i.e. they'll make your boot feel softer if you have a plastic tongue in your current liner. I like that!
  8. If you had cut a funky shape you could have sold them for $200. Really funky? $500! You also could use washers, but then the F2 covers wouldn't go back on.
  9. So true! Just try it, it's a small change. You may find you have a preference for how your riding style changes at lower or higher binding angles. 20 cm is the baseline that works for 90% of people. Then try narrower and wider to see if you like them. My personal preference: Under 20 cm feels more like a skwal, with toe and heel side turns feeling more similar. I'm gravitating more towards the wider end of the spectrum, it feels more like snowboarding. I've been absolutely loving a 23 cm waist board this year, and now my 20s feel narrow. Others love 14 cm boards. But you don't know until you try.
  10. I think you're underestimating the amount of sand used in Winterpeg. A shovel would be more appropriate in some areas.
  11. My last day was 2 weeks ago. Last few days were some of the best carving snow of the season, which was a pleasant surprise! Now I'm waiting for street sweeping to clear all the sand off the roads so I can play on the surf skate.
  12. Wind in the screw a bit to move the toe and heel closer. When you can't push the boot down hard enough for the moving pins to click in place, then it's too tight. That's not a red flag, but I like mine a bit tighter than that. The system relies on preload between the front bail, the pins/wedges on the ramp of the heel pushing up, and the moving pins holding the heels down.
  13. Interesting idea! Could help with that last tiny bit of heel lift where my liner slips upwards. Thanks!
  14. Never fails - planned carving meets yield powder. It's win-win either way!
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