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To much pressure on the front foot


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Hello

First I’m from Germany. If my English isn’t correct. It won’t get better 🙂

i m a pretty good snowboard rider with softboots, carving is not a problem. 
For 2 weeks I bought a used raceboard f2 speedster because I want to improve my carving. 
After 1day of riding it  my front leg was near death. 
all the weight was all the time on my front foot. If I shift the weight back, central over the board. the board was total out of control. Also I have to shift my weight a lot in the front. And ride in an awful position. 
hope you can give me some advice to improve my setup. 
thx a lot 

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Hi! and welcome on board!  I'm sure you are going to get tons of replies quite quickly and I'm going to guess that the first thing to debug is your stance, since this is the root of many problems.  First off, what angles are you riding?  What width stance, and is your stance centered longitudinally (length wise) with respect to the binding inserts?  What kind of boots/bindings are you using?

 

One of the first things you need to do is find a good comfortable and stable neutral stance when just standing on the board on the floor. A really good start-point is going to be found here: https://beckmannag.com/hardboot-snowboarding/a-hardboot-manifesto-v1  look for the section "Boot/binding board interface".  Give that a read and come back with some more details on your stance.  I'm guessing there is probably some fundamental differences between softboot and hardboot carving which plenty of folks will get into.

 

Needless to say there shouldn't be undue pressure on just the front foot.  I like to really jam on the nose at the start of the start of my turns but the board winds up feeding itself through the whole turn, shifting my weight towards the back.  At the end of the day (unless I'm riding lots of powder on a narrow board) both of my legs are equally worn-out. 

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Board should ride straight  and flat on a gentle slope with a neutral stance. Leaning left or right should make board do the same. It would seem your front leg is the victim of either stance or binding position. As Corey mentioned carpet carving is a pretty good way to sort it out except if the issue is binding centering fore and aft on the board that will be an on the hill adjustment. 

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Welcome! Assuming you have F2 bindings, you will probably benefit from buying another lift kit and installing it under your front foot toe. If you can’t wait, and if you have a lift under your rear heel, try moving it to under your front foot toe. Also, remove any cant wedges. Then experiment from there. Good luck!

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20 hours ago, Jack M said:

Welcome! Assuming you have F2 bindings, you will probably benefit from buying another lift kit and installing it under your front foot toe. If you can’t wait, and if you have a lift under your rear heel, try moving it to under your front foot toe. Also, remove any cant wedges. Then experiment from there. Good luck!

Also, those cant wedges can be stacked in opposite direction, to create a 3mm lift. 

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If as soon as you put any weight on the rear foot you lose it, try moving both binding forward 1/4 inch do a couple runs, move it forward 1/4 in repeat until board turns too much then move bindings back 1/4 in to find sweat spot.  I ride with too rear foot weight, so I ride with bindings in front of board center

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Yeah you can get what for most people is enough lift for toe/ heel etc with the standard wedges, at least 1 degree front toe lift/ 3 degrees back heel lift is possible with the standard set. That's what I use.

Check the binding set up. If you are using toe/ heel lift, make sure they're the right way around (ski shops can inadvertently assume they're identical)! Also check your boots: I ride with my front boot "fully upright" and the rear "fully down", as well as the above lifts. However different boots can require different set up (eg I rode "flat" with old snowboard hard boots).

Finally don't forget https://www.frozen-backside.de/

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Hello

thx a lot for all that help  

Board f2 speedster 158sl

Front 54*

Back 46*

Stanz 44cm

deelux hardboots us12 big feet😅

Deelux x bone carbon intec 

in the bindings are some lifts, keeping the outside of your foot up. 
if you look from the backside on the Bord it looks like this  

Tail >__        __< Tip

maybe change the lifts and move both bindings more to the front. 
 

yes if I put weight on the back I loose it. 

 

Edited by Germans Dontlaugh
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Yes, it does look like your stance need some work... 46o on rear binding, on a not so wide board and US12 boots! You must have alot of toe and heel overhang! I'm 5,11", M28 (us10) boots and have 50o on rear binding on a 21cm waist board! My stance is also 49.5cm, I have F2 Titanium bindings and ride totaly flat, no cant or lift.

Is your front boot lock in a flexed position? if so you might want to lock it in a more vertical position and keep the rear boot a bit more flexed or in walk mode, you should get a more comfortable position this way.

Can you clip your boots on the board and post photos from different angles?

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23 minutes ago, ibrussell said:

(inseam X 1.7)

Check your units.  Also, something tells me the OP uses the Metric system.

This article might be helpful:

http://alpinesnowboarder.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/canting-and-lift.pdf

With US size 12 boots I'll make a guess that you're at least 183cm tall.  In which case you will probably feel better with around a 50 to 52cm wide stance.  Get rid of the cants for now (the wedges tilting your feet inward) and try to achieve some toe lift on the front binding and heel lift on the back binding.  You're going to need to increase your binding angles so your toes and heels don't drag in the snow.  Also that board might be too small.

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Hello

Yes I m 182cm. 
no my shoes don’t look over the edge of the board. 
on the front of the binding it is 36* degrees written on a scale.
and on the back it’s 44*.
But I was thinking that can’t be correct. 

I will try more stance and the toe lift in front and heel lift on the back. 
i know the Board is not perfect for me. It should just be a try. I don’t want to spend much money if I m not sure I want to get into the race stuff. 
 

hopefully I can test in 2 weeks  this weekend we have storm. So no snowboarding  

 

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5 hours ago, Germans Dontlaugh said:

on the front of the binding it is 36* degrees written on a scale.
and on the back it’s 44*.
But I was thinking that can’t be correct. 

Maybe you have the scale rotated.  Normally we say 0 degrees is the boots pointing straight across the board.  90 degrees is the boots pointing exactly towards the nose of the board.  So hopefully your bindings are actually at 54 degrees on the front foot, 46 degrees on the back foot.  This can be an OK place to start, but as you get better you will tilt the board up higher and your boots will start to drag in the snow.  Then you will need to increase binding angle.

Unfortunately in such an unusual sport, one must buy equipment to try and then sell it if it doesn't work out, and buy something else.  Check out our classifieds for used and new-old-stock gear.  Good luck!

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