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tail following nose?


1xsculler

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29 minutes ago, 1xsculler said:

All other things being equal what position on the board would likely facilitate the tail following the nose of the board, a position a little towards the nose or a little towards the tail?

NFCB 172 SCR 10/12.5/11, waist = 20, 20 " stance width, 55/55

All things being equal. 

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4 hours ago, 1xsculler said:

All other things being equal what position on the board would likely facilitate the tail following the nose of the board, a position a little towards the nose or a little towards the tail?

NFCB 172 SCR 10/12.5/11, waist = 20, 20 " stance width, 55/55

Centered to forward is how most boards are intended to be ridden. I once had a Coiler that liked a little weight on the tail. I should have moved the bindings back 1/2"

IF the tail is not following the nose, the rider might need to adjust the weighting on the feet (i.e. the rider is pushing too hard on the front or back foot). Generally though, when I think of the tail not following the nose, I consider that the reason is the rider is twisting the board. The front and the back foot are not producing the same edge angle on the snow. That means the nose and tail are trying to make different arcs.

A set up that is not correct for the rider can cause this issue. Also, twisting/rotating the upper body can also be the source of the problem. When the upper body is rotated too far forward, it will rotate the hips forward, which will drop the rear foot toes and make it difficult to impossible to maintain the same edge angle at the back foot as at the front foot.

Edited by Buell
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This post/thread covers the same kind of ground i.e. how to get the board to track smoothly in the turn. Click "SunSurfer replied to a topic" to go straight to the post.

It really is as @Rob Stevens said. "All things being equal"

 

Edited by SunSurfer
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1X,. I have been riding my Nervana Balance for three seasons, every time I find something new about how it likes to ride.  First, make sure you warm up your legs and lower body, get loose.  If you are going to be riding on perfect conditions, don't worry about anything else here, just go ride.  

The board wants to be on edge.  The higher the better.  It will make very tight turns or long turns depending on your input.  I have found that if you initiate the turn, down weight, high angle you can throttle your turn.  When I over power the board, it doesn't like it.  Go to your favorite run and practice , break it down into parts.  When your body is comfortable, that board will follow what you want it to do.

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I'm sorry but with a progressive radius sidecut, ridden in a "neutral" position, the tail is never going to follow the nose. It can't because the sidecut radius is different. You can try to compensate but weight shifting or moving the bindings around (this sounds like what you're trying to do) but you are dealing with multiple radii. 

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16 hours ago, 1xsculler said:

All other things being equal what position on the board would likely facilitate the tail following the nose of the board, a position a little towards the nose or a little towards the tail?

NFCB 172 SCR 10/12.5/11, waist = 20, 20 " stance width, 55/55

This is a vague question.

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4 hours ago, Boarder_Ted said:

I'm sorry but with a progressive radius sidecut, ridden in a "neutral" position, the tail is never going to follow the nose. It can't because the sidecut radius is different. You can try to compensate but weight shifting or moving the bindings around (this sounds like what you're trying to do) but you are dealing with multiple radii. 

At the risk of initiating another sidecut discussion, I think you need a variable sidecut in order to describe a perfect arc in the snow. If you intersect a cylinder with a plane at anything other than a 90 degree angle, you will end up with an ellipse. In order to end up with an arc on the plane / in the snow, your initial sidecut needs to be an ellipse, with tighter radii near the ends of the board. I think this is, at least partly, why manufacturers have come up with variable sidecut radii.

But to make matters more complicated, the loads are applied through two boots, the snow is not rigid, and there is a need for varying the turn radius. Hence the complex 3-D geometry on modern carving boards. Camber/rocker combinations, sidecuts and flex patterns all come into play - as well as the structural support of the snow on the day you are riding.

I don't think I have answered the original question in any way.

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If you're back all the way in your binding mount options it's certainly a riding thing. I would think that on most carving boards the mounting options are for stance width more than front/rear set. The position of the groups dictates what the designer intended for a centered stance. That being said, too much or not enough forward lean on the rear boot or binding could inhibit your shifting weight to the rear quickly or effectively. 

If the board feels good at turn in and mid carve try pushing down and pulling up on your rear toe throughout the carve. A very slight gas pedaling action should produce dramatic results given your set up and alignments are in place. This is a quick way to create the twist in the board that Beull was referring to. If you get results, then find you are constantly cranking down or up on your toe a whole bunch for long segments of a carve it's time to go back and look at your body alignments and binding/stance/boot setup.

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