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eces 2004 photos


ruhtra
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heh. that one you linked to jack..thats pretty fckin funny. dude looks like someone out of starship troopers or somethin!

how the hell can one ride with no eye protection? I wouldnt be able to see!

I just realized that pic might be of someone here. Im not tryin to be mean, I promise:)

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Originally posted by ruhtra

Hey! I scanned the film from eces 2004 faster than the previous year!

http://photo.ruhtra.com/04311a/04311.htm

enjoy!

arthur

Damn I really need to hook up with y'all for a day morning of shooting I figure I can burn my 3 1GB (that's about 900 images) card up fairly fast on my D70 and still have a fun day carving. Upload them to a server sometime later and poof everyone would have images nice and easy...now I just need to insure orders to the east coast.

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Originally posted by Gecko

Damn I really need to hook up with y'all for a day morning of shooting I figure I can burn my 3 1GB (that's about 900 images) card up fairly fast on my D70 and still have a fun day carving. Upload them to a server sometime later and poof everyone would have images nice and easy...now I just need to insure orders to the east coast.

You should go quality over quantity.

I've got an EOS-20D now. I prefer shooting raw (~90 shots/1GB) and I'm learning my way around the post-production stuff.

arthur

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Guest thomas_m

Bob- you don't say what output you think looks dark but it may be a calibration issue. The thing with digital is that as much as possible you need to have all your devices working together in the same color management space. It's easy with Macs but more problematic with PC's. Your problem could be as simple as your monitor being a little off in it's brightness calibration. Or it could be your meter...

I shoot with a D1x and a D100 almost always in apreture priority(sometimes manual) and pretty much get what I expect as output from the monitor and my inkjet. I do shoot NEF's which give me some leeway on whitebalance but I rarely push the exposure in the conversion process as it increases noise and I'm usaully shooting in low-light noisy environments anyway.

T.

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I've found that with the D70 I usually need to go +1/3 when I shoot in aperture priority mode and +2/3 on the rare occasions I opt for point & shoot.

These two pics were good on the meter, but both could really use 1/3 more light. (pics are full-res, so be prepared to wait & scroll)

http://www.tuckerdogdesign.com/productivity_software/whistler1.JPG

http://www.tuckerdogdesign.com/productivity_software/whistler2.JPG

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Guest thomas_m
Originally posted by Bob Jenney

I'm, sure it's my learning curve.

Again, I'm sure it's me and not the camera.

Probably not. It take a while to get used to the fact that there is very little 'tail' to the exposure curve with digital(my only real gripe with the format). So you don't get that gradula dropoff in tonality at each end that you get with good film - blown highlights and blocked shadows are the result. It's kind of like shooting professional slide film. This is going to be even worse with subjects like snowboarding where the dynamic range is so huge.

In general, if you can center the bell curve of your histogram a little toward the right, it seems to work best. Here's a couple references for the rationale:

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/expose-right.shtml

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/restore-clipped.shtml

Another good article on histogram basics:

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/understanding-series/understanding-histograms.shtml

I'm in the middle of a year-long project that's done on film. After 100 rolls, I am sooo tired of souping negatives and the nasty chemicals, scanning, dust spotting, ad infinitum. Once this is over, it'll be rare that I shoot film and then nly until digital B&W gets a little better.

Have fun,

Thomas

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but who the heck is this tool?

http://photo.ruhtra.com/04311a/n311a29c.jpg

Juts kidding of course**.

yeah yeah . . . I was riding without goggles. . . mine kinda died at the ECES and I was to cheap to go out and buy new ones at that given moment.

"someone out of starship troopers . . . " D-sub. . .to each his own. never heard that one, but more power to you! Its the most comfortable riding outfit I have come across.

The thing I found interesting about the ECES this year is that there were lots of great on hill photos, but what I remember the most were the number of smiling faces on the hill. I wish we had taken more pictures of that. Truly an event about everyone having a good time!

Thanks for the pictures arthur!

**picture is of Peter Thorndike for anyone who didn't know. member of the US olympic team.

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thought it would be fun to compare some of the toe-side turns taken from about the same vantage point of a couple different riders to compare body mechanics. . . just for fun.

Had to flip around some of the goofy riders to look like the rest of the world :D sorry about that guys. anyway . . .kinda interesting.

http://www.ourwalden.net/art/comp.jpg

Lets see,

top to bottom, Thorndike, Myself, Fin, Drawing a blank on the name but I want to say Rod for some unknown reason from NZ I believe, followed by . . . damn, drawing a blank help anyone?

What to learn . . . Thorndike rips no matter how he looks riding. My a$$ is still way to high in the air. If you piss Fin off, he runs over you and your wife on the first day of the event (sorry had to). The Guy in the blue looks like he is having more fun than the rest of us, and I personally think the guy in black on the bottom has very clean strong form and looks really good.

I should get back to work.

-Todd Brown (~tb)

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Originally posted by ~tb

http://www.ourwalden.net/art/comp.jpg

Lets see,

top to bottom, Thorndike, Myself, Fin, Drawing a blank on the name but I want to say Rod for some unknown reason from NZ I believe, followed by . . . damn, drawing a blank help anyone?

Guy in blue is Chris Couse from Toronto.

For a few minutes this afternoon I saw snowflakes in Toronto!!! Thanks to everyone for the good words and hope the upcoming season starts soon.

arthur

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yeah that chris guy looks about as relaxed as you can get!

tb...just pokin fun a little. I still trip on how so many carvers look more like skiers than snowboarders:)

and..the thorndike pic...sure looks like he's way ahead of himself there, but...be pretty stupid to question anything he's doin since the dude has been around how long?

nice pics all around. good job!

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" I still trip on how so many carvers look more like skiers than snowboarders..."

Maybe thats because a lot of us probably used to be skiiers and still identify more with them than with our half pipe brothern. I know I identify more closely with skiiers than I do people spending most of their day in the pipe and park.

just my 2 cents. . .

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Originally posted by ruhtra

You should go quality over quantity.

I've got an EOS-20D now. I prefer shooting raw (~90 shots/1GB) and I'm learning my way around the post-production stuff.

arthur

I have a number of reasons that I don't use NEF Raw for subjects such as Snowboarding...one speed...the D70's buffer fills to fast and takes too much time to write RAW's (I shoot continous and the only camera I've seen that will shoot NEF fast is the D2H and that is way to expensive for my blood) Two, size/file usablity, I don't care to convert everything to jpeg it takes up too much of my time that could be spent in other ways. I run the photolab on the USS Kitty Hawk where I look at upwards of 2K images a day anyway. There are things that RAW's can be used for, Printing for instance...my Noritsu's will not read NEF (nor the Canon equivilant) nor can you post them to the web. All the imagery that I send to DC for release must be in JPG so I just use that for the most part.

As for shooting...I have the the EV set at -.3 which seems to give me a good image...CCD's are like slide film over exposure is good...and I only really shoot in manual or rarely shutter

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~TB, I feel the Vest-n-Fleece combo. Back when I was doing amateur Ski Patrol at school that was the usual.

Of course, it's a lot easier to pull off and stay warm in when you're back inside every 15 minutes or so like I was back then.

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Originally posted by Gecko

I have a number of reasons that I don't use NEF Raw for subjects such as Snowboarding

I think we'll just have to agree to disagree. And we have different cameras so their relative strengths and weaknesses will dictate the workflow.

My film camera (EOS-3) can shoot continuous at 7fps and I thought that was too slow to be a particularly useful motor drive and typically only ever shot 2-3 in a burst (occasionally 5-6) so the 5fps on the EOS-20D doesn't impress me much. It's simply too slow and a Toronto Sun sports photographer (Stan Behal) once did a talk here and was asked about using motor drive. He had (film) cameras that could shoot 10fps and he said timing the shutter was the only way. Basically the continuous mode never saved a shot and he's certainly used it plenty. 0.1s is just too long.

As for jpegs I actually shoot raw+small_jpeg so I have 1728x1152 jpegs saved for quickly reviewing on a computer and the card writing is fairly fast so I've never run out of buffer in normal use. I've just developed a light trigger finger perhaps. The on-camera review is very fast (and available even while writing to the card) so I can delete bad shots as I go quite efficiently but the screen is small.

arthur

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Originally posted by ruhtra

I think we'll just have to agree to disagree. And we have different cameras so their relative strengths and weaknesses will dictate the workflow.

My film camera (EOS-3) can shoot continuous at 7fps and I thought that was too slow to be a particularly useful motor drive and typically only ever shot 2-3 in a burst (occasionally 5-6) so the 5fps on the EOS-20D doesn't impress me much. It's simply too slow and a Toronto Sun sports photographer (Stan Behal) once did a talk here and was asked about using motor drive. He had (film) cameras that could shoot 10fps and he said timing the shutter was the only way. Basically the continuous mode never saved a shot and he's certainly used it plenty. 0.1s is just too long.

As for jpegs I actually shoot raw+small_jpeg so I have 1728x1152 jpegs saved for quickly reviewing on a computer and the card writing is fairly fast so I've never run out of buffer in normal use. I've just developed a light trigger finger perhaps. The on-camera review is very fast (and available even while writing to the card) so I can delete bad shots as I go quite efficiently but the screen is small.

arthur

different camera's I tend to shoot goups of images of a scene, and on the flight deck it's easy to blow though the buffer even on JPG High. Yes I'll admit I've gotten lazy since I put my film camera's away (3 F3's with MD4's) as it's easier to shoot and delete later than it is to replace a roll of film so I burn pixels. On camera review eats battery so almost all of our cameras have it turned off. We went totally digital about 2 years ago so I have a lot of camera's at my disposal, D70's, D100's D1's, D1H's D1X's D2H's and DCS Pro's I grab what best fits the situation I'm shooting and so do my other shooters. The D2H is as fast as my old F3's but doesn't have the resolution (+4MP) and the DCS Pro is slower than molassas but wow is that a big image even in JPG. For me time is more important than archival quality and a JPG from a 6MP camera is more than big enough for DOD...I tend to think in term of what can get my customers a product in the least amount of time RAW's just add a time consuming step that gives us more file size that we really need. As a point of reference over the last year we have 34 DVD's and 110CD's of archived images, I'd have at least 3 times that if we shot RAW regularly.

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ignorant question:

are there any "consumer" digitals that have a fast shutter speed? I bought a Canon S200 a couple years ago, and the pause between button push and actual photo makes the camera useless for action shots.

I loved the compact size of it though...any suggestions?

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