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TD2 Bolt Grease?


johnstewart
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Mounting hardware heads need grease. Do not grease the threads on them. Do not use a petro based grease like WD-40 or you will disolve your board. I use Pedros Syn Grease but Bomber Butter is just as good. I have also used Slick Honey as well.

As for thread lock. I have heard bad things about that disovling the epoxy around the inserts. Do it if you want but a properly torqued bolt should not come loose. BTW a bolt can only be properly torqued if it is lubricated so the bolt head does not give friction.

->Ben

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Folks...WD40 is not grease...it is not a lubricant at all...WD stands for "water displacing" It is good for cleaning, especially something like a motorcycle or bicycle chain but you still need to lube the chain afterwards. I often use WD40 as a pre cleaner to loosen up the gunk on bearings chains and other rmechanical parts before doing a proper cleaning with degreaser. As far as greases go I've said it before stay away from "white lithium" type greases when dealing with plastics and aluminum. It will just speed up wear and tear.

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John , please clarify. Your referring to the mounting bolts? Not Intec Heel pins? Correct?

Heel Pins = Grease / Yes

Mounting hardware/ NO GREASE!! / Blue Threadlocker after "Primer" YES!

Whoa. Lots of responses; thanks. I'm still confused, though. =)

Not talking about Intec heels, no. What is "Primer"??

I'm speaking of the threads on the (4) bolts mounting the TD2 plates to the board, and the threads on the (3) bolts mounting the other TD2 assembly onto that.

I've just found that (especially after upgrading to the big T hex driver) that when I'm releasing the bolts, they have a serious metal on metal squeak. Kinda seems like the metal might be welding itself together.

I didn't use (blue) loctite because I move the bindings between boards, adjust angles, etc., a fair amount.... and I figure that is going to build up over time. Also, it would seem I would have to put a lot on to insure that all of the threads are lubricated, no?

thanks!

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Ever cross your mind that perhaps you're tightening the hardware TOO TIGHT using the T-wrench?

I agree however I have never found a torque spec for binding bolts. Not that I want a lawyer to get involved but I know that I would feel better if I had an actual spec to tighten to

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Ever think that offering the guy a suggestion or a solution would be better than a flipant remark..... and I assume that being a retailer of this stuff in a small market, education and customer satisfaction would be front and center in your mind, not off handed remarks that do nothing but piss someone off.

I thought I wanted to call you my local retailer for this stuff, I am not so sure now. Maybe you have enough customers already....

Seems to me that Dave did in fact give some advice there. "Don't tighten them so much". How do you get upset from from that remark? I don't understand why you are being so sensitive.

->Ben

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Some people would not think about overtightening, just not being tight enough.

It is why I brought up using the bigger T hex driver (the one from Bomber, red handle).

When I think about the horror that would be a front binding release from the board at the wrong time, and given the force then applied to my knee by my 220lbs or so of mass, and given the ease of applying more torque with the larger tool, it certainly *is* possible I'm cranking them too hard. =)

I guess to those of you using that particular tool in relation to the typical small allen wrench, do you feel like you have to back off a little more on the torque than you would expect to prevent seizing/squeaking of your bolts in your bindings when released?

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Machinery's Handbook will give you a torque value, I'll look it up for everyone tomorrow morning. I don't believe in loctite, and yes I know WD40 is not a lubricant. I purposely hold the Allen wrench closer to the middle to avoid overtorquing, and really just tight enough to prevent loosening is tight enough. Lube under the head will help when you go to loosen, but the coefficient of expansion of aluminum versus stainless tells me that tight enough at 20 below will be overtight at room temp, and hard to loosen. Any sort of lube on the threads will reduce friction and allow you to strip the threads out of the aluminum at a lower torque. Think about it. This is why the binding manufacturers tell you to check the fasteners before riding. They know more about this than we do. And guys, take it easy on Dave, his response was appropriate given the circumstances. Eaglez, you told me you wanted a pair of Cateks and never called me back.So there is always two sides to it, isn't there?

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At WTC, I've watched Fin tighten bolts on TD1's and TD2's with his Bomber-issued t-handle wrench and saw that he wasn't afraid to apply pressure to the wrench. The wrench handle did not ever twist/deflect the stem of the tool. That would have been too much pressure applied to the tool and to the binding bolt assembly. Using the the term, 'wrench tight' and meaning that term to indicate that he (Fin) was tightening to the point that the wrench and bolt were capable of handling without deforming the tool is what I saw.

After witnessing this, I became aware that I had not been tightening my binding bolts as tight as I saw Fin tighten bolts. I do not mean to speak for Fin or for the doctor he does not play on TV.

Mark

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Just wondering if the rubber under the binding acts like a lock washer. if you compress the rubber, the bolt will be under constant pressure and hopefully not loosen up.

Maybe bindings should have the type of cap screws that Snowpro has but instead of using round flat washers, use concave washers to hold tension on the bolt.

Some of the new Burton stuff has a built in lock groove filled with goo. Nice, but they only last a few remounts.

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:AR15firin:AR15firin:AR15firin:AR15firin

Damn!

eaglez just got told!

so what was that first post that almost started a riot?

metal on metal, the coating on the heel peices of the intec TD1s will actually spark sometimes when loosend, must be the coating

I gotta second the use of grease, thats the way to go, I don't use threadlock due to changing boards too often

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Whats next?
Safety wire , as in airplanes?

why don't they use loctite in airplanes, then they could do without PITA safety wires.

If I knew my bindings were losening up, I would consider safety wires. My legs and my pain threshold depend on it.

Until you rip your bindings out of the board, you do not appreciate having bindings that hold you upright and a board that won't fail you when you least expect it.

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FYI Darren, in response to your quote:

"On the customer service note: I never did receive a response from you regarding my buying a board from CK, so I figured that it wasn't worth the effort for you, which was fine with me. Would have liked, no, expected a response from you either way."

I did respond to you. I would be happy to resend the email so you can see the original date if you would like. I don't care what you and Dave say to each other, but you just insulted me, since I am the one who answers all the emails, and I believe I have been nothing but helpful and professional with you. If you feel otherwise feel free to email me personally at andrea@yyzcanuck.com

Andrea Morgan

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I'm going to jump in here and second John's comments on YYZ's service. Having dealt with them three times, three times they've got the job done with style and I couldn't be happier. Awesome service and great people.

So what was wrong with Dave's post? It's very possible to overtighten stuff. I'm pretty strong for a girl and my ex husband/head mechanic was always kicking my a$$ for overtorquing and stripping things. Better to undertighten and check, than overtighten and strip, I say ...

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why don't they use loctite in airplanes, then they could do without PITA safety wires.

Loctite isn't used in airplanes because it often fails at inopportune times and there is no way to know if it will fail. Safety wire rarely fails and you can SEE when it will fail (broken wire). You are right about the PITA with safety wire I just finished removing a bunch of safety wire that I had put on my motorcycle for trackdays in Hawaii...that was a PITA :smashfrea

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Loctite isn't used in airplanes because it often fails at inopportune times and there is no way to know if it will fail. Safety wire rarely fails and you can SEE when it will fail (broken wire). You are right about the PITA with safety wire I just finished removing a bunch of safety wire that I had put on my motorcycle for trackdays in Hawaii...that was a PITA :smashfrea

When I worked in that industry, we put it on anything that was not ny-lock. This was instruments to go into military, commercial, and regional business aircraft.

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