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Guest Frappe

I know you're all going to call me a loser (it's ok, I can deal with it)

but the things that keeps me away from skateboarding is the lack of connection to the board.

Oh, and concrete's a mite harder than snow.

Once you get...used to it, I guess, how different is it not being strapped to the board? Would it be madness to use a front-foot strap or something of the sort?

Not a serious strap, but kind of like they have on mountainboards, where it's basically just a piece to hold your foot down.

So, advice? opinions? We have some ok hills here, and this thing looks really fun.

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For riding down hills, not being attached to the board just isn't an issue. Although the first time you do aggressive cross-under turns (where you are sucking your knees up to your abdomen) is a bit of a leap of faith as its not obvious that your feet won't just leave the board. But they don't.

You can get hooks that attach to board and curl over your front foot. They look super-dangerous to me as they seem to make it really hard to quickly run off your board, which you absolutely have to be able to do.

You can get (or make) a smaller stopper to attach just in front of your front foot that doesn't hook over the foot, but simply stops it from sliding forward. I've never used one, but it seems like it might be useful, especially when pumping aggressively (which sometimes causes my front foot to creep forward).

But I basically wouldn't worry about the lack of foot/board connection. Gravity seems to be enough to keep them together.

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Oh, and concrete's a mite harder than snow.

I don't think that there is much difference between concrete and snow (or ice) in terms of hardness on slopes where I sometimes ride. Biggest difference comes IMO from the fact that after fall you slide on your cloth to stop while on snow, but on concrete you slide on your skin to stop.

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Originally posted by Frappe

Would it be madness to use a front-foot strap or something of the sort?

Not a serious strap, but kind of like they have on mountainboards, where it's basically just a piece to hold your foot down.

So, advice? opinions? We have some ok hills here, and this thing looks really fun.

you won't need straps or hooks for the t-board. maybe if you plan on ollying.

the board is extremely easy to turn but there have been occasions where i had to jump off the board. i have a video of it at http://thebuckstone.tripod.com. a strap would just get in the way. the friction tape works good enough for me.

i bought my board 2 years ago. it came with 2 rubber wheels. i found it to be really slow but that's a good thing for riding steep hills. the hill where i ride is not steep so i bought urethane wheels. works great for speed (actually too much for me) but the hill started to wear down my wheels. i ended up mounting a rubber wheel in back, urethane in front. the board is not as fast but the wheels last longer. just my preference.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Nope, it was quite flat, but I had the faster wheels on and it was on the sidewalk.

I rode it all yesterday and it was amazing once I got somewhat used to it. The only problem is that I seem to have a broken bearing because when I pressure a toeside I get this damn clicking noise. Oh well.

Very fun though, everybody buy one!

Mike: wear bike gloves if you have any :D

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yes, it can be annoying. i had that problem on a rubber wheel. i think you can hear it on my video footage.

i recently had cracked the hub on a urethane wheel. it made a clicking noise but only on one side. it got progressively worse after a couple days of riding to the point i didn't feel safe on toe side turns. i looked at the wheel and saw that some of the hub was missing. i must've broke the hub by dropping the front wheel down on the ground. i didn't have this happen with my other wheels.

post-1112-141842198147_thumb.jpg

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Originally posted by Jamie

Mike: wear bike gloves if you have any :D

I'm wearing bike gloves, and some old Rollerblade knee and wrist guards!

I've got less than two hours on my T-Board and there is already a ton of wear on my back wheel. I'm making much better heelside turns (unlike on snow) and the heelside of the wheel is worn down at an angle. Anyone else have this problem? I'll give Tierney a call tomorrow...

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Originally posted by bobble

yes, it can be annoying. i had that problem on a rubber wheel. i think you can hear it on my video footage.

i recently had cracked the hub on a urethane wheel. it made a clicking noise but only on one side. it got progressively worse after a couple days of riding to the point i didn't feel safe on toe side turns. i looked at the wheel and saw that some of the hub was missing. i must've broke the hub by dropping the front wheel down on the ground. i didn't have this happen with my other wheels.

This is terrible considering how expensive they are :eek:

Ever figure out what the problem with the rubber one was?

I have been trying to do equal heelside/toeside to avoid the uneven wear, it seems to be working so far.

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QUOTE]Originally posted by Jamie

This is terrible considering how expensive they are :eek:

Ever figure out what the problem with the rubber one was?

I have been trying to do equal heelside/toeside to avoid the uneven wear, it seems to be working so far.

one of the bearings is bad on the rear wheel that's pictured in the middle of my previous post. when i replaced the rear wheel after it was well worn down, problem solved. but then i had my front wheel hub crack....

i do equal toe side / heel side as well. the wear pattern on the wheels might reveal something about how you ride boards in general. anyways, i don't think much about wheel wear. it rides about the same except its harder to balance at the start. think of it as a balance board that moves.

i ride goofy stance and feel very sure-footed on the t-board. lately i've been trying to ride it regular stance and, well, thats tough. try that for awhile.

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I've been riding my T-Board around my neighborhood, which has quite a few skateboarding kids. The looks and questions I get remind me quite a bit of.... the looks and quetsions I get from young lunch tray riders at the mountain!

Anyone else have any advice regarding the rubber wheels? I crave more "edge grip".... I'm blessed with a variety of pitches and fast pavement in my neightbohood!

Oh yeah, and I'm gettin' me some elbow pads. I only seem to go down on my left elbow - it's a bloody mess.

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Originally posted by Mike T

I've been riding my T-Board around my neighborhood, which has quite a few skateboarding kids. The looks and questions I get remind me quite a bit of.... the looks and quetsions I get from young lunch tray riders at the mountain!

Anyone else have any advice regarding the rubber wheels? I crave more "edge grip".... I'm blessed with a variety of pitches and fast pavement in my neightbohood!

Oh yeah, and I'm gettin' me some elbow pads. I only seem to go down on my left elbow - it's a bloody mess.

I think, if possible, that I may actually be getting more questions on this then a carving board :eek:

If the wear is uneven you can always rotate it. Are you riding with one or two rubber wheels?

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Originally posted by Jamie

If the wear is uneven you can always rotate it. Are you riding with one or two rubber wheels?

I'm riding with two urethane wheels. I'm fishing for opinions on rubber wheels before I drop $45 on a set of them. I've already rotated the urethane wheels several times in one week! Picking up speed isn't a problem for me... washing out on tight turns and landing on by butt and elbows has been a problem.

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Originally posted by Jamie

Try buying just one rubber wheel and stick it on the back, that's what I do (and what they recomended since I didn't want to spend the extra money). They do offer noticable traction compared to the urethane's.

That's all I needed to hear - I'll try it! Thanks!

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Originally posted by Mike T

I've been riding my T-Board around my neighborhood, which has quite a few skateboarding kids. The looks and questions I get remind me quite a bit of.... the looks and quetsions I get from young lunch tray riders at the mountain!

Slightly off topic as I'm riding a "regular" longboard skateboard, but I still got a bunch of looks by the joggers, rollerbladers, and bicyclists gone by me on the closed road I was at. I found a great mellow hill which keeps me at a nice 10-15 mph while carving a bunch of turns. I had one family stop and ask me to go down ahead of them so they could watch and several outloud conversations like ("That's a skateboard... a big one") One bicyclist cried I was crazy. And several people commented to me about needing a ride uphill as I walked back up the hill.

To my minor surprise, hiking up the hill isn't very tiring when you aren't weighted down by big and heavy snowboard boots and walking on snow. I found the hiking a good break from all the tight turning on the downhill (loads of quad usage). The hill is only like 200-300 m, but I'm not sure my legs would benefit much from a hill that was twice as long.

Anyways, I think it really improving my alpine form. I played with a friend's Carveboard, but I didn't take it to the hill because I felt it to be too "tippy" in that the slightest effort will let you get a huge lean and tight turn. I like that fact that my longboard really kind of makes me "work" for the turn as I personally have issues with heelside edge angle and pressure.

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