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TD2 Binding Guidance


AK in PA
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Looking at the Trench Digger 2's and hope you guys can answer a couple of questions.

How do I know which suspension ring to get? (soft, med, hard) I ride small, east coast mountains here, often icy. I'm leaning towards the "happy" medium out of ignorance.

And what about cant/lift options? (0, 3, 6) Is it recommended to get a cant for each foot or just the rear? This sounds dumb, but if you use a cant on the front foot, do it set it to cant your foot towards the nose of the board or toward the tail? Finally, how will various degrees of cant affect my already burning thighs? (make it better or worse?)

Right now I have no cant on the front foot of my PJ, and a Burton cant disk (degree?) on the rear foot. I often find myself sitting too far back and end up with my back thigh on fire. If I do get new equipment this year, I want to do it right.

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Originally posted by AK in PA

Looking at the Trench Digger 2's and hope you guys can answer a couple of questions.

Great choice!

Originally posted by AK in PA

How do I know which suspension ring to get? (soft, med, hard) I ride small, east coast mountains here, often icy. I'm leaning towards the "happy" medium out of ignorance.

Well, you might be surprised how well the soft yellow ones work. But you will not be disappointed with the Purple. I am 200 lbs and I like how the yellow suck up a lot of vibrations and other "stuff".

And what about cant/lift options? (0, 3, 6) Is it recommended to get a cant for each foot or just the rear? This sounds dumb, but if you use a cant on the front foot, do it set it to cant your foot towards the nose of the board or toward the tail? Finally, how will various degrees of cant affect my already burning thighs? (make it better or worse?)

With the cants you always want the slopes on the cants to slope toward eachother. That way you get toe lift in front and heel lift in the back. The fron disk will slope toward the tail and the back disk will slope toard the nose. I would also start with all lift and no cant both front and rear and then make adjustments to the cants to dial in your stance if necessary.

To start, I would recommend you go with 3* front and rear. It's a neutral setup and I think it will help you stay centered on the board.

->Ben

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Most of the time, cant and lift is used to get a more natural stance. And like mentionned previously, it is usually oriented towrds the center of the board. Also, with canting and lifting, you can get a wider stance, giving more stability and power, but it depends on your liking. Lots of people here like 3 front and 3 rear, I personnaly ride 0 front and rear.

In your case, your burning thigh may be due to the fact that you're putting too much pressure on it. There are several factors coming into consideration. With the exact same setup, I had burning in the FRONT thigh because the rear canting was pushing my weight forward, so I'm not really sure what to do here...

Derf

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Guest AlpentalRider
Originally posted by AK in PA

Right now I have no cant on the front foot of my PJ, and a Burton cant disk (degree?) on the rear foot. I often find myself sitting too far back and end up with my back thigh on fire. If I do get new equipment this year, I want to do it right.

Your current burton uses a "max cant" which is a 7 degree cant plate. If your not feeling any stress on your knees from your current positioning, I would recommend staying with 0 on the front and 6 on the back. Your back thigh burning even with the 7 degree cant tells me either your stance is set too far forward on the board, or you are leaning too far back when your ride (or both). The 7 degree cant should be helping you maintain weight forward body positioning, so it almost sounds like your fighting it and basically squatting on your back leg (which will cause thigh burn).

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I've always tended to fiddle a lot with any gear I have. Golf clubs, skis, guns, snowboards, it doesn't matter. I've played a lot with stance widths, angles and cants. I've been riding hard boots for 12 years and after about 10, finally settled on 3 degrees of lift/cant under my front foot. I think that early in a person's learning curve, lift under the back foot keeps you in a more aggressive stance and out of the back seat. As you get more comfortable with the style, you can rock back to neutral or beyond. Try standing on your board on a declined ramp like you're headed down the fall line and you'll see where I'm coming from.

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Originally posted by trikerdad

Try standing on your board on a declined ramp like you're headed down the fall line and you'll see where I'm coming from.

However this is not analagous to any situation one might encounter while riding.

Sounds to me like there is a technique issue. Usually the complaint of rear thigh burn means you're not getting far enough forward and driving the nose at the carve initiation.

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If you just buy the cateks, you dont have to think about what ring or what angles! They come with the only rings that they make, and you can just play around with the set-up and find the angles that are actually right for you rather than having to pick a cant disk that may or may not be the right one for you.

Just my personal oppinion.

but. . . to be fair, the suspension system on the TD2's is better than what catek has to offer for suspension . . . so if thats what your intereste in go with the soft e-rings.

Season comming soon!

-Todd

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I run 3 degrees front and rear, because that's what's comfortable for me. Seems like a reasonable place to start.

IMO there is a huge variable being overlooked in all of this talk about leg burn: setback. I used to burn up my front quads too fast and the problem went away after I moved my stance forward a couple centimeters (no cant change at all). My stance was a little too far back, so I was leaning forward to compensate for that. Leaning forward meant more load on my front leg, and that was what caused my front leg to burn out faster.

The way I see it, my CG needs to be in the right place relative to the center of the board, and I got it into that place just by riding and finding that if I lean too far back or forward my turns skid out. The fact that one leg was burning out faster than the other just meant that there was more load on one than the other. Adjusting the setback moved my feet a bit so the load was the same on each when my CG was in the sweet spot. Cant just evens out the pressure around the cuff of the boot when my body is in position.

Not that cant is irrelevant... it's just not the first thing that came to my mind, nor was it the thing that made my legs happy. I only know of two ways to get lower: bending the knees, or leaning forward at the hips. All other things equal, leaning forward at the hips puts more load on your front leg. I'ts probably to compensate for that by using more cant on the front leg, and less at the rear, to help shift your hips rearward, but I haven't tried that.

For me, being able to hold my spine more upright was a bonus. If you really want to be low (I can see how it could help if you race, but I don't race), then leaning forward will help keep your CG low as well as forward, and that could change your preference.

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