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Temp. for scraping wax?


surfinsmiley
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if you've got the room. make yourself a large wax catching tray to fit below your tuning stand. Haven't made one for myself yet but I know my wife would appreciate it. Its not just messy but dangerously slippery on a painted concrete floor.

and if you are rubbing on wax instead of dripping you'll have less to scrape off

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Guest jschal01

Check the sharpeness of your scraper. With a good scraper you should be able to scrape it off. You don't want to let the wax get cold too quickly thoguh or you'll get very limited absorption. Ideally, keep the board at ropom temp post-hot wax overnight, or at least for 3 hours. Hot waxing and then immediately "cold scraping" by, say, laying the hotwaxed board on the snow to cool, is a good way to strip ptex hairs, etc. off as part of maintaining base structure, it just doesn't give your base a chance to really suck in the wax.

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Rather than melt a bead of wax off the tip of the hot iron, this season I've been experimenting with simply 'crayoning' the wax on the base--and then ironing it in.

This allows me to completely cover the base with a much smaller amount of wax than when I do the 'drip from the tip' method, and makes far, far less wax shavings to clean up after scrapng, brushing, and buffing.

In reading most tuning manuals, other than 'rub & cork' at the top of a course, I have not seen any recommendations to use the crayon technique. Is this because there is some added benefit to having the larger volume of melted wax on the base?

I mean, other than boosting sales for the wax companies.

Thanks for your thoughts and counsel.

________

Colorado medical marijuana

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Sean @ Snowperformance showed me a trick that works great - the "warm crayon". Take your block of wax, touch the end to the iron and very quickly rub it on the board. It's a lot less work then the "cold crayon" method and it puts just enough wax on the base to satisfy even the thirstiest of bases, but there winds up being very little excess to scrape off.

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Of late, I've left the wax on my board until I get onto the hill so I avoid the mess in the limited space that I have in my condo. Not too concerned about doing a super clean job either ... I'll do a few quick passes down the middle. I don't worry too much near the edges as they'll get pretty clean after a few runs.

I'm not racing, just freeriding, so I'm not really concerned with speed. In this case, does the temperature at which you scrape really matter that much?

Gabe

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Of late, I've left the wax on my board until I get onto the hill so I avoid the mess in the limited space that I have in my condo. Not too concerned about doing a super clean job either ... I'll do a few quick passes down the middle. I don't worry too much near the edges as they'll get pretty clean after a few runs.

Looks over at freeride board, with a layer of wax still on it...

Yep, I do the same for freeriding, except I don't even bother to scrape it at all. Warm crayon on, iron in, leave it at that. Although I've only been out once on it this season, just enough to take off the storage wax job :)

I'm not racing, just freeriding, so I'm not really concerned with speed. In this case, does the temperature at which you scrape really matter that much?

Scraping or not scraping in such a case doesn't really matter, IMO. If you are going to scrape, do it cold, and as you've bothered to do that, go the whole hog.

But I'm no master.

Simon

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Guest jschal01

The temp whenyou're scraping the board isn't going to matter that much, it's the temp of the board, and wax, immediately after the hot wax and then for the succeeding few hours that affects whether you get good wax absorption.

As far as not scraping at all, I guess it depends how much you apreciate a smooth-running base. To me, it would sort of defeat the purpose of hot waxing, and in many conditions will mean you're sort of sacrificing your first couple runs for tuning purposes. Why not hot wax less often and simply use a rub-on in the interim in that case? Or, simply use Zardoz Notwax in lieu of wax, it's very good at warm temps and tolerable at colder temps, and takes you a minute to rub on.

But, if you're having fun, then whatever works. :)

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