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MADD 170 Undulating


Chubz
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Looking for input from you experts. I have been out on my MADD about 4 days now and evolving into what it can do. As I have become more aggressive railing it, the heelside holds no matter how low I go, my butt is closest it ever been to the slope and nice deep arcs, but toesides have been undulating ( large chattering),whatever you want to call it. It seems the board will hold,then release, hold then release in a very quick series until I ease up on the edging and it stops.

I went back to feathering it more on toesides, but it does lock into the turn like my toesides. Just looking to try and deduce what the causes could be and if anyone else that has been on one of these experienced similar behavior.

I weigh 205.

Conditions were groomed hardpack with ice underneath.

Should I be closer to the nose with bindings

Push the nose harder

Lose weight

Whatever, just looking for input.

Keep in mind my last board was an Aggression GS 173 and I wouldn't experience this behavior when riding it, but my heelsides were no where near as locked in as on the MADD. My confident turn is now my heelside since switching boards.

Thanks

Greg

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For reference, I weigh 195. My toeside is generally quite a bit stronger than my heelside. At my weight, I found that the board pretty much wanted to immediately flex into a tight arc under my weight, it didn't offer much resistance until it was arced pretty hard. I've never had this experience with any other board - I've mostly Doneks and Coilers, but a few others as well. I'm used to soething that flexes hard when ridden hard, and flexes less when ridden gently. Not so with the Madd.

In any case... I found this worked really well on smooth ice, but on anything uneven the board had a tendency to skip around or "ride chaotically". Rider error, or too heavy a rider? I suspect both. However, I sold mine because it just wasn't working out for me except on smooth firmpack, which I don't see a lot of. (Usually PacNW firm is either poorly groomed after a couple weeks of freeze-thaw, or is of the "springtime morning, turns to slush" variety where the corduroy has a really high profile until it slushes up. It didn't do well for me in either case.) Coilers, and a Donek Olympic... so far handle these conditions with ease. The board handles the conditions better, I'm more comfortable, I can concentrate on working out the flaws in my technique.... you get the idea :)

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sounds like you might be getting your center of mass too far out away from the edge. Usually this happen when you lean too much with your upper body, and don't bend your legs enough. Try reaching with your front hand to the heel on your front boot, but keep your upper body upright. Hopefully this little drill will help keep your weight stacked over that edge and get rid of the chattering. hope this helps.

Steve

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I'll give this a shot and see what happens. Any pics out there that would show perfect toeside center of mass/body position? I do flex my legs a good bit and keep my upper body upright for the most part. I purposefully focus on not bending over or leaning over when on toeside and try and keep weight over the edge.

I will keep my eyes peeled for the types of boards mentioned.

I was also just wondering if the Volant Aggression I was on has a stiffer flex pattern than the MADD, which may have possibly lead to holding thru my toesides.

Would a softer flex pattern lead to what it was doing, i.e. starting the turn, then release and then grab again and release and so on into a series about 6-7 cycles of that until I eased up on the turn?

Is a stiffer board designed to hold thru a carve under heavier pressure (both rider weight and angle of carve)?

Just dont understand why it would hold a hard carve thru heel but not toe :confused:

If it is a matter of the flex pattern of the MADD being a touch too soft, I will save it for those optimal days, but I absolutely love riding the thing, epsecially in what it has done for my heelside.

Thanks Again

Greg

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Greg,

Interesting dilemma. FWIW, I would first check the deck and make sure the base is flat and you don't have something weird going on with the tune, especially with the toeside edge. Assuming that is the case, and you are riding fairly loose and centered, you might consider three things:

1) If your bindings are too far forward, you may be overloading the nose during the toeside turn and causing that "catch and release" feeling. Since your toes are closer to the nose of the board, it would make sense that this would be more prevalent during your toeside turns. If your bindings were too far back, I suspect you would have the feeling that it would take quite a bit of effort to get it to initiate the turn.

2) If your binding angles are overly steep, you will find that the heelside initiation will feel more seamless, but you can't quite get enough pressure on the toeside to get a clean turn going. Try relaxing the angles and getting the toes and heels of your boot closer to their respective edges until the turns start to feel more even and symmetrical.

3) You have just plain lost your mojo with the Madd. I recommend in that case that you express mail it to me ASAP so I can perform some heavy duty "diagnostic" tests on it and get you back your toeside karma. ;)

-Sean

I'll give this a shot and see what happens. Any pics out there that would show perfect toeside center of mass/body position? I do flex my legs a good bit and keep my upper body upright for the most part. I purposefully focus on not bending over or leaning over when on toeside and try and keep weight over the edge.

I will keep my eyes peeled for the types of boards mentioned.

I was also just wondering if the Volant Aggression I was on has a stiffer flex pattern than the MADD, which may have possibly lead to holding thru my toesides.

Would a softer flex pattern lead to what it was doing, i.e. starting the turn, then release and then grab again and release and so on into a series about 6-7 cycles of that until I eased up on the turn?

Is a stiffer board designed to hold thru a carve under heavier pressure (both rider weight and angle of carve)?

Just dont understand why it would hold a hard carve thru heel but not toe :confused:

If it is a matter of the flex pattern of the MADD being a touch too soft, I will save it for those optimal days, but I absolutely love riding the thing, epsecially in what it has done for my heelside.

Thanks Again

Greg

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probably say that you are not used to the angles being so high

if I ride high angles I get touchy on my toesides, with pratice it should go away

if you have one of the madds from last year they were soft so you are for sure on the high end of the weight range

when my angles get high I start to lean too far back while turning toeside and this makes me bounce.

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I tried a few things today that helped.

Dropped the front and rear binding to the rear inserts

Worked on shifting my hips over and beyond the edge of the board

Compressed the knees more though the turn

changed front angle to 66 and rear angle to 63 (both here 65)

The last three were some technique pointers given to me Marian at Blue

Things were clicking today

158 arrived today, it should be interesting what it has in store for me on Sunday

GO STEELERS!!!

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Letting a friend borrow it for a couple weeks. He set the bindings up front and was riding very well today on it, so maybe its just me.

Had the 158 out for the first time today and this board absolutely rocks. Cant wait to get it on hero snow because it was holding like a mother on granular icy conditions today.

Thanks for the input

Greg

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Guest Chippewa

I have a new Madd 170, and I notice the same scalloping effect on my heelside edge when I want to make a long heelside carve. When I make a heelside turn aggressively, the thing just whips around fine without the scalloping effect. Another guy I ride with had the same experience on his Madd. I think the short sidecut radius, combined with the softer flex pattern of this board is responsible. It simply wants to hook up faster than you expect when trying to make a longer turn. I think the board performs best when you make an effort to turn quickly and aggressively. In my experience it's the longer carves that cause the problem of the catch-release-catch-release of the edge.

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