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Anyone ever injure a nerve in the ankle?


snow|3oarder
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hey, I currently have a terrible pain in my front ankle.

It is hard to describle the source of the pain. There is no visible swelling. It seems to come from the whole outer side of the joint. The pain comes and goes; I can walk on it fine for hours and then it suddenly kills and I can't put any weight on it.

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Anyone ever injure a nerve in the ankle

A few years ago, I got similar injury in the shoulder. Not when snowboarding, but waterskiing !

It took me about 1 year to completely recover the sensitivity.

2-3 first month it was painful to lift my arm over the shoulder. 6 month later, the pain was no more troublesome, but I lost sensitivity and strength in arm and hand. Sometimes I had itch in the arm / hand. Thereafteer, all this troubles disappears progressively.

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hey, I currently have a terrible pain in my front ankle.

It is hard to describle the source of the pain. There is no visible swelling. It seems to come from the whole outer side of the joint. The pain comes and goes; I can walk on it fine for hours and then it suddenly kills and I can't put any weight on it.

this is similar to what i have. no swelling. damn annoying though. i can put weight on mine though.

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hey, I currently have a terrible pain in my front ankle.

It is hard to describle the source of the pain. There is no visible swelling. It seems to come from the whole outer side of the joint. The pain comes and goes; I can walk on it fine for hours and then it suddenly kills and I can't put any weight on it.

this is similar to what i have. no swelling. damn annoying though. i can put weight on mine though.

Just thinking about that one.........there are 3 common things that occur with those symptoms.

1. Inflamation of the Bursa, it can sometimes squeeze out and get impingned by the bones=Intense sharp pain.

2. From hyper-flexion injuries or many "micro traumas" the end of the bone can develop a bony spur on the end of it which causes pain at a certain point, usually nearing the point of the maximal flexion.

3.Failing to use the joint properly, eg. hip bone/ knee injury, leads the ankle to be use in a non-optimal way= Tightened/stretched ligaments=instability= pain sometimes-pain free the next moment.

Go see an accupuncturist.:biggthump

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When i was in soft boots around new years all of the sudden i felt a pain. It felt like i tore a ligament, but there was no swelling. doctor says its an injured nerve in the ankle. did this happen to anyone ever? what was the recovery period? :AR15firin

snow|3oarder,

Bummer to be injured - especially during the riding season.

Hope you can enjoy the sport again soon.

The following is not to be construed as a diagnosis for your particular injury and is certainly not a substitute for a competent physical evaluation by a licensed professional.

The following are assumptions:

1. Your injury occured while executing an aggressive move and/or crash.

2. There is no bony fracture, luxation or sub-luxation.

3. There is no gross (large) tendon/ligament avulsion/rupture.

4. You are not diabetic.

5. Your injury is trivial (read - non-debilitating, non-lifethreatening, and can be expected the heal eventually regardless of treatment or lack thereof).

The following should be regarded as theory not fact, so put on your bll sht detector. :)

Your pain may be protective pain, low intensity ( 2-3 out of 10) and diffuse. This kind of pain prompts us to reduce our use of the part involved.

The injured area is likely much smaller than you think. It may not be a nerve injury but rather a tensile strength failure in a tendon insertion. Tendons connect muscle to bone thru the periosteum which spreads the tension force over a relatively large area. [A ligament can be thought of a tendon that connects one bone to another bone.] If the tension applied to the periosteum is too great or applied too quickly so that the forces do not have adequate time to spread out, it can cause micro-avulsions (tearing) of the periosteum from the underlying bone. Somewhat analogous would be the rock climber with his rope connected to the rock face thru several pitons to form, hopefully, a fail-safe attachment. The periosteum, which by the way, has lots of sensory (pain) neurons, can be thought of as millions of tiny pitons.

These tears will heal, but all healing depends on blood flow. No blood flow => No healing. Now, the body part we are talking about, a tendon attachment, has almost no blood flow! It is mostly connective tissue. The living cells in the tendon get their nutrients from the tissue fluid. The tissue fluid comes from the blood capillaries and it moves through the tissues (very slowly!) as the tendon is used. Think of a wet tee shirt (no, not there:), in your hands) twisted hard, with water being squeezed out. Now put it back in the water and relax it. Twisted it hard again. That is like what happens in a normal tendon that is being used - tissue fluid is squeezed out then replenished. Micro-sized injury is occuring with normal use and micro-repair is underway. More use => more injury. More use => more tissue fluid flow => faster healing rate to compensate for the greater injury that occurs. This is the stable natural balance. Then an excessive force comes along causing catastrophic tissue failure on a microscopic scale. Suddenly, massive damage occurs (actually it is likely still microscopic but it isprobably several orders of magnitude larger than normal use tissue injury). Pain increases (pain neurons are always sending signals at intervals even when there is no 'pain' as such, as a way of verifying the integrity of the circuitry). Many pain neurons now send many more signals. These signals should break thru the neural filtering network and result in conscious perception of pain.

More pain perception => less use of the part => less flow of tissue fluid => slower healing.

Compounding the situation is the inflammatory process. This process is supposed to facilitate healing but it typically interferes with it, slowing it down. At the site of the injury structural damage and some cell death has occured. The debris must be cleared and repairs made. Cells from the bloodstream squeeze through the walls of the capillaries and force their way into the damaged area. Some of these cells consume the debris and then leave the area. Ought to work fine, right? Not quite so easy. Imagine a fender-bender on the BQE. The emergency response teams are called into action. All the police, fire, rescue, wrecker teams from the entire city are sent at once to clean up the mess. Rather unhelpful, that, ay? Excessive inflammatory response causes congestion of, and therefore a decrease in, the capillary blood flow. This can be minimized if you take your prescribed anti-inflammatory medication - before - the injury occurs:).

Thank you for your patience for reading this far. Now I will cut to the chase:). To increase the rate of healing, the goal is to increase the flow of blood and tissue fluid to the injured area. At your pleasure and at your own risk, with your fingertip explore the entire painful area. Press firmly with the tip of just one finger. You will likely locate a point where the pain level shoots up. This spot is starving for nutrition. Do a fingertip massage in this area. Press firmly enough to bring the pain level up to a 4 or 5 (out of 10) for 5 to 10 seconds. The pain should go back down almost immediately upon release. If it does not - DO NOT CONTINUE. Then pause a bit and repeat, moving your fingertip back and forth, round and round, up and down. Do this cycle for 2 to 5 minutes. Repeat several times a day. No need to massage all of the adjacent area, you can but your finger will get tired sooner. You mechanically force the tissue fluid to move out of the area. Newer fluid moves in so the cells will have the building materials with which to the repair. The pain spot may move some distance between massages. Find it. Repeat daily until you can no longer find it at all.

No medication is needed but I do recommend drinking an ample amount of an aqueous solution dihydrogenmonoxide in water daily:).

I hope this helps.

Don

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