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powder and bomber bindings


Guest matburditt
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Guest matburditt

I need some advice. I currently ride K2 click in bindings on my all my boards. K2 has apparently quit making them and I am in a bind. I love clickers however need new boots and can not find them. I have been looking into hard shell boots such as Garmont or Scarpa, but the problem is finding bindings that will fit on my board. I am totally addicted to powder, my wife wonders if I may leave it for her. Colorado Ski and Golf recommended I look into Bomber gear. Are bomber bindings good in backcountry? What boots are recommended, and are they good for hiking and backcountry? I love to carve but my true passion is the powder. Any advice would be great.

Thanks

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Matburditt, I used to be a firm beleiver in the k2/shimano clickers as well, but had problems finding boots too. I went back to strap bindings, but if you are really interested in staying with the clicker type setup, shimano japan still produces them (both boots and bindings) and they have developed a new system as well called the accublade. I have seen and have friends who use and swear by the accublade and you may be able to purchase it from a japanese shop or direct from shimano but it may be a bit pricey. If you are interested check out shimano's site and contact them: http://snowtec.shimano.co.jp/publish/content/snowtech/sic/jp/index/products.html

as for moving from a clicker setup to plates for powder riding seems a bit extreme. I love the response plates and hardboots gives, but for powder riding this is a bit of overkill, but with that said, if I could find a hardboot that was light enough and flexible enough for backcountry use I would jump on the chance to get it, but I have not found a plate binding combination (boots being the min point of failure for me here) that meets my requirement for hiking and b/c. Another place to tak with guys that use the bomber split setup and others is: http://www.telemarkskier.com/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=forum;f=1

good luck and hope you find a setup that meets your needs.

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Guest Zach Davis

Matt,

I ride Bombers exclusively... on my resort board, on my splitboards, on my mountaineering boards. As far as I'm concerned, the work well for everything.

The bigger question is whether or not you are going to be able to make the switch from soft boots to hard boots. I made the switch last year, and I've never been happier, snowboarding.

When I made the switch, though, I didn't do it halfway. I called Fin at Bomber, and had him teach me how to set up my bindings correctly and talked a little about the differences in technique.

I see a lot of people on splitboards in the backcountry whoare using AT boots with the same stance angles and technique that they used with soft boots. it just doesn't work... they look like Frankenstein's Monster.

There's no system more reliable, solid or simple than plate bindings and AT boots, for the backcountry. Just make sure you know what you're getting into... a good idea is to put some TD2s on your resort board, with steep angles and the right cant and lift, and get used to the feeling and technique, before you commit to it in the backcountry.

Zach

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I'm jealous of all of you that are so happy with your hardboots. I started riding hardboots last year, and they still f***ing hurt my feet and legs so badly that I'd rather be watching TV when I take my hardboots on anything other than a perfectly groomed run. And even when I'm on a perfectly groomed run, if I'm not functioning at the highest possible performance, those violent frequencis, or, chatter, effing kill me. It could be my boots, but I've had them fitted, and god da**it, they cost $400! At this point I'm riding in my old vans with a no name set of bindings on a steepwater. Although it sucks, it's comfortable, and I don't want to kill myself at the end of the day. I'm taking into consideration selling my head stratos pros, keeping my plate bindings and waiting till I'm rich to seek an alternative hard boot.

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Guest jschal01

Zach,

You have talked previously about boot mods to the AT boots to give more lateral flex, I believe? I realize it's not rocket science, but if you actually undertook these mods where exactly did you take material away?

I did a search, I just couldn't find anything addressing which specific alterations were/are made in the case of AT boots, as opposed to what Fawcett and others used to do with ski boots. SUppose it's pretty much the same thing, just starting from a more-flexible initial product in the AT boot.

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I'm jealous of all of you that are so happy with your hardboots. I started riding hardboots last year, and they still f***ing hurt my feet and legs so badly that I'd rather be watching TV when I take my hardboots on anything other than a perfectly groomed run. And even when I'm on a perfectly groomed run, if I'm not functioning at the highest possible performance, those violent frequencis, or, chatter, effing kill me. It could be my boots, but I've had them fitted, and god da**it, they cost $400! At this point I'm riding in my old vans with a no name set of bindings on a steepwater. Although it sucks, it's comfortable, and I don't want to kill myself at the end of the day. I'm taking into consideration selling my head stratos pros, keeping my plate bindings and waiting till I'm rich to seek an alternative hard boot.

Sorry to hear your hoofs hurt so much. FWIW not only might the boots be too stiff but if your binding placement isn't ideal the situation will definitely be aggravated. The net result is you will spend 90% of your time fighting yourself and 10% riding. Before you give up I would recommend you play around with your stance width as well as softening up the boots if at all possible. I went with intuition liners on my AF600's. Best thing I ever did because the wrap around liner supports my ankle very nicely ( I use custom foot beds as well). This allows me to ride with lower buckle settings without sacrificing performance which translates into all day comfort. If you are out of ideas drop me a line and we can discuss some other options.

Regards,

Sean

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Guest Zach Davis
Zach,

You have talked previously about boot mods to the AT boots to give more lateral flex, I believe? I realize it's not rocket science, but if you actually undertook these mods where exactly did you take material away?

I did a search, I just couldn't find anything addressing which specific alterations were/are made in the case of AT boots, as opposed to what Fawcett and others used to do with ski boots. SUppose it's pretty much the same thing, just starting from a more-flexible initial product in the AT boot.

I never did anything to change the lateral stiffness.... what I have done is to add more forward lean: On my Garmont Mega Rides, I popped out the pin that holds the walk/ski mechanism in place. Then, I pulled out the flat peice of metal that actuallye creates the forward leana and drilled an additional hole in it... works great.

I've been hesitant to play around with anything else, because I've never actually tried snowboard specific hard boots. I'm going to try some this winter. Then I'll go to the guy that designed the Mega Rides and get his feedback on how to modify them to be more similar... assuming it's possible.

Zach

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