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Angle Setting


Guest pvhsracegirl
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Guest pvhsracegirl

Hey, i was wondering what you guys thought of my angle settings....They were set on (front) 57 (back) 51

and now i have them set (front) 63 back (58)

I decided to change them because i couldnt ever lay out that deep carve while racing, i always seemed to not be able to get my knee over, and leaned back still...will these settings help my stance out?

thanks....any comments welcome!

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height? weight? shoe size? board? type of mountain you ride? Style of riding? I ride duck 51/54 and I find it the most comfortable. this year I plan on changing my stance/angles every time I go out to see if there is something better. play around with them until you get dialed in

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Start off by setting your angles to perfectly match the toe and heel edges of the particular board that you are riding, what are those angles? This will depend on the length of your boot and the width of the board where your bindings are mounted. This beginning setup is where most people start off.

For racing or more experienced carving, these angles are increased so that you face more downhill. For beginners, these angles can be reduced with a small amount of toe and heel overhang.

Cant adjustment and stance width will also have a lot to do with where your back knee will be able to tuck.

My $0.02,

Hugh

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pvhsracegirl,

When I first started hard riding I rode about 45 front and 48 back. I believe in having a steeper back binding so to drive my back knee into the back of my front knee and left on heel turns (regular stance). Over the last 15 years the angles have grown to 66 front, 69 back. Last season I rode soft a little more and have my soft angles about 40 front and 43 back. I have never raced but have definately hit many gates on all different angle stances. It comes down to how you specifically ride and what you like best. I like to really drive my knees into every turn and always square my shoulders to the hill on slalom turns. On Gs turns I do the same. Having more of a straighter stance allows me to keep my hips over the board and not to the inside of the turn (No butt hang). I like to ride like a GS SKI racer skis. I feel my angles help my do this.

Good Luck

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I knew you were a good kid! :biggthump Hopefully you'll find it helps you engage the nose of your board better this season to "set" your carve, especially on your toeside turns. I started out 55F 50R and have progressed to my current settings of 63F 58R. Stance width was another variable I toyed with last year and found that by adding an inch to my stance width it helped lower my CG and I felt more comfortable over my board. I'm 6'3" and mostly legs so anything to get me closer to the ground helps out. Good luck this season and I hope to see you up at Shasta,

Have fun!

Paul

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Guest pvhsracegirl

Thanks Everyone! I dont have my board with me, its at a different house right now, but when i can, i'll read off the specs on the board...thanks for everything

Cassie :)

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Hey, i was wondering what you guys thought of my angle settings....They were set on (front) 57 (back) 51

In general for racing you want your angles them to be as low as possible without any overhang. While higher angles are possible, you have more feel for your board at the lower angles, and it also makes it easier to feather. I ride 57, 54, and I find if I'm to go any higher it affects my ability to ride well without carving.

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Guest jschal01

http://www.alpinecarving.com/binding_setup.html is still a good resource.

Separate the stance Q though from the the Q of laying out big carves, while racing. What was the course like -- conducive to carving? And, mechanically, are you able to carve well out of the gates?

The recommendations to go to a pigeon stance show that what works for individuals varies, a lot, according to preference and body type and overall technique. Before you do something radical like go pigeon-toed, though, just remember it's way out of the mainstream so think about why you're doing it.

Finally, my own 2 cents would be to echo Jim's comments.

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For racing or more experienced carving, these angles are increased so that you face more downhill.

My $0.02,

Hugh

WRONG!!!!!!! Angles depend on board width. Racers are going to wider boards in the last few years, this also means that angles are getting shallower. Most people I know are riding in the low 50's to high 40's, some are even lower.

To the original post is sounds like your problem is a technique problem, not a stance issue.

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