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Radio Frequency for Hardbooter?


patmoore
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This topic may have come up before but has anyone ever established a standardized radio frequency that we could all use to find other hardbooters on a mountain? Something easy to remember like 7-11?

I'm hoping to be at Okemo on Saturday and figured it would be a good way to hook up with anyone else who plans on being there.

Pat

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Guest Randy S.

In Tahoe we mostly use 5-12. However, the lower number frequencies have been come somewhat over-run in the past two years. Some of us have tried to get things shifted up into the channel 20 range for increased range and decreased cross-traffic.

Oh, we call it Radio Free Carve.

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all carve, all day ! Tune in at ???? on your radio dial. And now a word from our sponsor..... Fin, take it away!

Seriously, a common hookup channel is needed. I realize most will migrate to a private channel setting, but most radios will scan. How about posting the "carver-channel du Jour" at the liftside message boards?

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I always thought 8-01 ("BOL") would be good, but I assume that channel gets pretty crowded.

Would be nice to standardize on one though. TahoeCarvers is the only group I know of that's gone so far as to post a channel on their Web site - that's as good a standard as I think we'll get. Randy, what's the new channel you guys are switching to?

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yes, the channels above 14 are no longer FRS frequency and utilize higher power, it is called GMRS (general moblie radio service) Infact, you are suppossed to have a licence to use them. (its a mail order licence) the reason being that anything above 2 watts of power require a FCC licence. GMRS can use up to 5 watts while FRS are limited to 500 milliwatts.

here is the FCC info on the whole thing:

http://wireless.fcc.gov/services/personal/generalmobile/

PS i'm not a geek just a former electrical engineering student. whoops same thing. ok a geek

:eek:

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I'd say we should either go with GMRS or HAM! Admittedly, it might be a bit unrealistic to expect people to get HAM licenses, but we do it for in-flight comms while hang gliding (2-meter), and it's worthwhile! (I'm K3LSW, by the way.) The advantage? You won't hear a peep from anyone else on the slopes! :)

I saw some Cobra radios on sale recently (about $70 for a pair) that claimed a 12-mile range. (WTF? 12 miles???) If that's not bogus, they must be GMRS!

Scott

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SWriverstone Scott So you are a 'diver driver'

I flew for years when I lived in SoCAl and did the Owens Valley every other weekend. Still got my WillsWing HP out in the garage. At that time there was a fair number of 2m radio and a lot of CB. I flew with a hopped up CB and long trailing wire antenna.

I'm somewhat of a techno-geek. I work for a radio manufacturing company that sells to military. Simply put, there is so very little total frequency difference betweem channel 1 and channel 22 when compared to the entire radio spectrum that the additional range which might be possible using 22 vs 1 would be almost impossible to notice. Our best bet is to use the highest output power and realize that terrain is our biggest problem. These frequencies are strictly LOS (line of sight).

I'd be careful not to be too chatty at 5w xmt pwr because battery life can be very short. Cold temps rob battery capacity also, and so we have a double whammy. I keep extra battery set in an inside pocket so they stay warm. I carry my radio in a small pouch on my pack's waist strap so I can hear it but it gets cold there.

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HAM huh, why not just get aviation radios, i hear no one is ever on 121.5!

I saw some Cobra radios on sale recently (about $70 for a pair) that claimed a 12-mile range. (WTF? 12 miles???) If that's not bogus, they must be GMRS!

they must have tested them on a real cloudy day with one on top of a mountain and the other in the valley.

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I flew for years when I lived in SoCAl and did the Owens Valley every other weekend. Still got my WillsWing HP out in the garage. At that time there was a fair number of 2m radio and a lot of CB. I flew with a hopped up CB and long trailing wire antenna.

Alright! Another "plumber" huh? We're getting rare these days, since everyone is switching to those "flying bag" things. :) (Paragliders.) The Owens Valley huh? I'm impressed---that can be some wild air!

Scott

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yes, the channels above 14 are no longer FRS frequency and utilize higher power, it is called GMRS (general moblie radio service) Infact, you are suppossed to have a licence to use them. (its a mail order licence) the reason being that anything above 2 watts of power require a FCC licence. GMRS can use up to 5 watts while FRS are limited to 500 milliwatts.

here is the FCC info on the whole thing:

http://wireless.fcc.gov/services/personal/generalmobile/

PS i'm not a geek just a former electrical engineering student. whoops same thing. ok a geek

:eek:

The current fee for a new GMRS license is $80.Better git me one those, quik like. :argue: yo, where you at ?

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