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Need help with choosing of new deeluxe indy boot liners


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so, my deeluxe boots are arriving soon and I already know I need new liners. and I wanted some opinions from others on which of the current liners I'm looking at is suitable for me or even suggest ones I don't know of yet

body specs: 6foot 135 pounds with considerable leg power compared to my weight

I use 100 flex medium volume ski boots (if that's a useful comparison)

what I'm looking for: something between medium soft to the softer side of stiff as to not over stiffen the boot for me. I do have a BTS system in my possession that I plan to try out on it.

here is what I've been looking at. my budget is about $230 USD shipping included

  1. deeluxe Hb liner: stiff from yyz canuck
  2. intuition tour wrap: medium
  3. Intuition tour wrap dual density: medium
  4. Intuition tour tongue dual density: soft
  5. Intuition downhill tongue dual density: medium

neglecting the densities of the intuition liners for which I will contact them later for that. which ones would you recommend?

any help regarding this question is greatly appreciated.

 

update: I got the recommendation back from intuition and they recommended the tour wrap dual density 12mm.

Edited by Pansersoldat
get intuition recomendation back
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the tour models may be well suited for a backcountry hardboot, but may not be the best fit for lift serviced alpine style riding/boot shells. perhaps it may work for some. very specific needs. bear in mind i have no experience riding a tour liner and maybe others can provide feedback who have. given the information provided, consider a tongue style liner as opposed to a wrap style = more forgiveness. #5 from that list or similar. just my 2 cents.

more forgiveness can be designed into a "softer" performance boot with the springs and liner. finding the right combination can take many years of experience through trial and error; technique and comforts adjust along the way. progress is made one way or the other. different shells such as the deeluxe T325 or UPZ xc12 and xcr or at8 have their own characteristics built in to accommodate these more forgiving specific needs as well. i believe the old indy model is most similar to 325's. the even softer 225's are no longer available as far as i know. what previous boots/liners do you have experience with? this may help. where you ride and conditions most regularly experienced may also help.

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4 hours ago, dhamann said:

 what previous boots/liners do you have experience with? this may help. where you ride and conditions most regularly experienced may also help.

My only experience with liners is in my ski boots. K2 recon 100 mv with stock liners.

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Try searching "liners" in the window in the upper right of this site for a bunch of prior discussions on this topic.

Another source to consider is Palau Liners https://palau-ski-boot-liners.com/en/17-dual 

EDIT:  Palau is the manufacture of Deeluxe Thermo Liners.

Decent off the shelf footbed https://patriotfootbeds.com/products/freeride-footbed

And if you feel you need different die springs https://www.leespring.com/compression-springs

Edited by Pat Donnelly
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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Odd Job said:

I would make sure those liners work for your leg shape/shins. Going to assume you're a cyclist or 

 I am not a cyclist. Just for reference im 6 for 135 pounds.  But I did intuitions fitment help thing and i put thin calfs because I do t know what their definition of medium calfs are.

Edited by Pansersoldat
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Posted (edited)
12 hours ago, dredman said:

Yellow spring BTS and mold the liners that come with boots.  That would be a good starting point.  Then see what your feet desire.  
 

Good at home boot fitting info here: http://www.alpinecarving.com/bootfitting.html

 

I would use the liner that came with them, but they are basically toast. I did get a used bts kit with blue springs and i planned to get a set of yellow springs

Edited by Pansersoldat
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Intuition downhill tongue would be a good choice, but I bought FX Race instead because the FX Race is at clearance price on intuition's website now.

Anyway, I feel like you can try any liner intuition offers that marked MV and in my experience Dual Density feels way better. It holds your foot, especially ankle, better while provide you with sufficient amount of support. 

In summary, I recommend trying DH Tongue (or FX race, I like the tongue shape of FX race better), hope it works!

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Liners are half of the solution to comfortable boots with good heel hold. The other half is orthotics/footbeds.

DIY footbeds are relatively simple and inexpensive to make and allow you to try out the effect before you make a decision to get professionally made ones. I'm still using my DIYs because they worked so well.

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Posted (edited)
46 minutes ago, Pat Donnelly said:

A couple of links to boot fitting tools & accessories:

https://www.tognar.com/ski-boot-fitting/?page=1

 

 

thanks. quick question if i don't need calf shims for my ski boots would that mean I have "medium calfs". and if i don't use insoles for my ski boots should that change for my snowboard boots?

Edited by Pansersoldat
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5 hours ago, Pansersoldat said:

thanks. quick question if i don't need calf shims for my ski boots would that mean I have "medium calfs". and if i don't use insoles for my ski boots should that change for my snowboard boots?

Calf shims - You may not need them as you first can adjust your boot buckles/straps.  As far as calf size, reach out to Palau for their opinion on sizing & density.  

Insoles, your soles may talk to you at some point.  

Expert insight https://beckmannag.com/hardboot-snowboarding/hardboot-binding-configuration/3foot-support

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6 hours ago, Pansersoldat said:

i don't use insoles for my ski boots should that change for my snowboard boots?

Some folks swear by insoles and/or custom insoles, so let your feet decide.  I have always used the Danner insoles from my favorite hiking boots that are readily available.  https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00061SJCE/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

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I rode for many years without proper arch support from an orthotic and thought it was fine. Then I tried them! I was able to reduce how tightly I needed to buckle up my boots, and had better heel hold and comfort than before.

The DIY version needs you to buy a pair of near enough arch support insoles, a tube of acetic acid / acrylic curing bathroom sealant and some Glad Wrap. So customised to you can be trialled for minimal outlay.

I used a pair of Specialized cycle shoe insoles, they come in 3 levels of arch support. I used the highest and still needed the arch built up even higher.

 

Edited by SunSurfer
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