Jump to content

Altitude Advice


MNSurfer
 Share

Recommended Posts

We've had a place at Breck now for 6 or 7 years. It's at 9600', and I'm a flatlander. It doesn't matter if I'm out there for a few days, or an entire month, but I never feel 100%. Maybe 93% is the best I can do. Though I'm never 'sick', I always feel just a bit 'wonky'. I've been doing out-West trips for 20+ years, and this is always the way it's been; As soon as I get back to DIA, everything is back to fine. I've always just accepted this as 'way of the playground', but it's getting kind of old.

Oddly enough, when there in the Summer, I don't have this issue. Weird?

Anyway, just wondering if there is any tips or advice to staying as optimal as possible, when at altitude for extended periods of time. Oh and please don't tell me it involves less bourboun.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't have a solution, but I have always suffered at altitude over about 9-10 thousand ft. I found info online from a Colorado altitude research project and they determined that there is some genetic component. You have to have a himalayan gene or something. It doesn't necessarily correspond with your level of aerobic fitness. 

If I exerted myself (snowboarding/hiking) I would feel all the altitude sickness symptoms of headache, nausea, etc. No matter how much water I drink. Tried the medication for acute symptoms. It works okay, but it makes you pee a lot. Even after a week or so, I still feel "off" at higher altitudes. After many years the best solution for me is to stick to mountains below 9,000 ft, or maybe try spending a month or more to acclimate.

I heard Coca leaves are supposed to be the best remedy. Ha! I just googled it and it looks like you can order them online!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Your brain is going nuts trying to establish a horizontal reference point. Try and help it. Gravol and obsessive hydration. Focus on specific points on the terrain not the white abyss. Mountain biking, horse back riding and sailing all jog the brain around and may be helpful to teach you new coping mechanisms. Hard to concentrate on carving when your head is spinning.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We're at 7,500 feet for the winter.  I'm at 220 feet in the summer.  Every year seem to get better.  This year on account of Covid, I spent 9 months there.

Humidity.

Dehydration can be a big part of it.  We use a good humidifier and that seems to help.  Drinking a lot of water is also a plus. We have been using a sodastream as a way to help ingesting enough water, but too much of that tends to affect your vocal cords, (which it did with me) so if you decide to use one, don't make it too concentrated with CO2.  

YMMV, but hope this helps.

 

Also what we've found is that it takes a month to START getting acclimated, and it continues to get better till about 3 months, and then things get back to feeling the way you do at home.

 

Edited by bumpyride
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sildenafil 😉

It will at least be interesting to see if it helps.

Centres for Disease Control have some good information on altitude sickness and the various options.

https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/yellowbook/2020/noninfectious-health-risks/high-altitude-travel-and-altitude-illness

Yes, cold air is dry air, but the fundamental issue at altitude is the lower available oxygen level because of the drop in atmospheric pressure.

PS: Pretty much ignore anyone who tells you stuff to do who, is not a doctor or, has not studied human physiology. I'm afraid that will include most contributors to this thread. I'm a doctor, an anesthesiologist, and an expert in the normal and abnormal human physiology of hearts and lungs. Reputable sources of information are what you need.

Edited by SunSurfer
Time to cut through the crap and anecdote.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, lowrider said:

Your brain is going nuts trying to establish a horizontal reference point.

LOL, that hit me hard... 😄

I drink a LOT of water, and then more. I probably triple my daily consumption on the day before travel and the first day. Then again, I don't drink a whole bunch. YMMV. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, bigwavedave said:

.I heard Coca leaves are supposed to be the best remedy. Ha! I just googled it and it looks like you can order them online!

Coca leaves do work and there are some studies about it as well. But it cannot be bought or shipped in the US. Any of the leaves I found online were not actually from the coca plant but guayusa/graviola mostly after doing some research. 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cocoa leaves worked well for me in Bolivia but no way you get the real deal in the US.  Diamox is good for the symptoms if you are going to be at altitude for a short time (week or so) but it makes everything taste metallic. HYDRATION! 

 

It's not a question of your brain trying to establish a reference point it has to do with swelling in the brain.  Also effects lungs the medicine is a diuretic to keep the swelling in check which exacerbates the dehydration that easily sneaks up on you with altitude and cold.  If it gets bad even 1 night at lower altitude can work wonders

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, Corey said:

LOL, that hit me hard... 😄

I drink a LOT of water, and then more. I probably triple my daily consumption on the day before travel and the first day. Then again, I don't drink a whole bunch. YMMV. 

Same for me.  My family and I go to Steamboat every other year.  I get a dull headache while I'm there unless I drink a ton of water.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As someone who lives at sea level where the tallest mountain is less than 4500 feet I start feeling the effects of altitude very very easily fortunately it wears off after a few days. There has been atleast a couple of times where ive lost a whole day of riding on holiday because i feel so bad that my balence is shot and i cant ride 😕

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cocoa leaves would be the bee's knees (mother in-law was in Peru, and it worked like a champ for her). Yeah, we have humidifiers in every room, running MAX the whole time.

My water intake is about 2-gallons per day, which is just slightly behind the Coors input.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share



  • Recently Browsing

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...