Jump to content
slopetool

Is there really a fear of toe or heal drag out there?

Recommended Posts

I'll admit I don't fear a little over hang if it's going to effect my stability.  What about your angles?  Have you ever put your boots in your bindings and tipped the board to see how much it would take to drag?  And even if it did would you even feel it or kick out your edge?  Just curious is anyone paranoid this is going to happen?  I get it if you are on a Skwal but I'd like to hear your thoughts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My guess is it would depend on your specific snow conditions. If you have a luscious, deep groom, a little drag wouldn't be (physically) noticed. If conditions are hard-hard, a heel/toe bite is more noticeable, if not potentially destructive.

I drag (toe) a little bit. But I also have M30's. I'm chalking it up to boot size and comfort, as opposed to my schitty carving skills.  

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, MNSurfer said:

it would depend on your specific snow conditions.

Amen. I think I could've dragged a boat anchor at Beaver Creek today and compensated. 

Those East Coast resorts I was recently at... No Freakin' way.

Yes I have tipped my board but I typically use an angle guide... I try to stay under 80-85 degrees.

Edited by lonbordin
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I fear overhang less than hangover... But, both can make you tip over. 

  • Like 3
  • Haha 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a frustrating day a while ago when trying to do heelside EC carves on very firm snow. Turns out the front boot upper cuff buckles were hitting, levering the edge out of the snow. 

It wasn't super sudden, just a gradual decrease in grip that lead to fall after fall. I thought it was something I was doing to the board, so lots of experimenting with posture and weight positioning ensued. Then I noticed the badly abraded pants cuff... 

It's admittedly-small window of conditions that cause me to want zero overhang, but I'm way too lazy to change binding angles based on snow conditions. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

depend on the amount of overhang if its not to much i find the board will tend to drift allowing you to ease up on the edge angle and rengage the edge but if there is to much overhang booting out tends to be pretty catastrophic, sudden and without warning.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's not toe or heel drag I fear, it's the sliding down the mountain  on my face at eleventy seven miles per hour.

Edited by nigelc
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wiping out on my soft boot setup from overhang is what catalyzed my dive into alpine gear.  Even so, the last time out on alpine gear, I had my rear binding pivot to the point the binding was overhanging.  Barely noticeable on the soft almost slush, until riding over glare ice onto my face...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you have a run where you can see your tracks from the chair, you can clearly see if you have heel or toe drag.

But then, I ride a lot of firm groomers where maybe one is more likely to experience boot-out and I also like to leave clean lines.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

East coast boot out on 18cm boards is what helped cement my angle preferences (and got me off soft gear years ago).

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, guys!  Great feedback.  I was concentrating on how I have been riding the past few days and I don't regularly carve low much anymore.  I ride 30 degrees on the front and 15 on the back.  That's on my highbacks and a 24 cm all mountain board.  I used to ride generally 63 degrees and 54 on my carving boards but nowadays I'm lowered those angles for more comfortable riding.

  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Many to most soft boots riders have some degree of overhang. If you are not cranking the board that far up, it's not an issue.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With soft boots, overhang can be a problem. However, if the snow is soft enough that your edge sinks in enough to cause boot drag, the resistance from the snow may not be sufficient to cause your edge to disengage. 

If the snow is harder, the same amount of overhang probably isn't enough to cause your boots to drag. 

I've put 1/2" risers between my bindings & board. I do often get overhang but it doesn't usually cause a problem. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's not paranoia if it's real, right? For carving I go for zero overhang. Always. Boot out is serious. It hurts, or can. If you aren't carving hard it's not much worry. Soft boot carving for me is limited by overhang. And the feel of an overwide board going edge to edge is a lot like the board riding the rider than the other way around. But that's just me. 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Losing an Edge can be serious...even though my boots are not over the edge, I have to buckle the toe straps over the top of my foot, or I will dig in and have them come unbuckled...this works quite well and have no boot out or binding out, no matter how far over I bring the board...though I am a SB with 45 45 angles

also, Boot out or Binding hitting the surface, wrecks the line...and the Line is all that matters

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/28/2020 at 7:54 PM, dingbat said:

Don't forget to cut your toenails.

Then buff and polish, make sure the polish is the correct temp, it's faster to use the correct temp.

In soft powder, boot out doesn't matter, on hardpack boot out as carvedog mentioned, will break your neck.

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always have toes and heels as close to my edges as possible with no hang. Never had bootout issues and don't want to.  Works in the east and I don't change anything when I go west.

Used to get bootout on skis before riser plates. Don't want to experience that on a board 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...