Jump to content
Note to New Members ×

Twisting the board while carving: who and... why?


RicHard

Recommended Posts

Hi everybody!

Sometimes I hear and read about twisting the board to carve in a different way.

There are people that pressure the toe of the front foot before pressuring the toe of the back one (in a frontside carve) or...

...people that pressure the heel of the front foot before pressuring the heel of the back one (in a backside carve). In both cases, they release pressure on the front foot before releasing pressure on the back one.

Such "technique" doesn't seem to have the same effect of simply shifting the weight fore and aft: is there anybody that use it? Which benefits could bring in carving?

Thanks in advance!

Ciao!

RicHard

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi, thank you for your answer!

Just try to bring your rear knee towards the center of the turn. Toesides and Heelsides. It has an angulating effect on your board.

It's not so clear to me: I was thinking I had to twist the front part of the board at the first half of the turn and the back part of it at the end of the turn but... am I wrong? It's always the back part that has higher angulation?

Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This sounds way too complcated for me. I try to keep things easy.

Why not going step-by-step? After initiating the turn and getting on edge, move your knee slowly but steadily towards the center of the turn. You will definetely feel the effect, because you have time throughout the whole turn. If you are comfortable, then start twisting the front part. See what happens. I could guess, if it is possible at all, it has very little effect and will cause you trouble with the timing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Often if you pressure the toes of the front foot followed by the back foot (toeside) or lift the toes of the front followed by the back (backside) it will help to make your turns a rounder shape. This is especially effective on shorter radius turns at lower speeds. Don't over think it, back foot follows front foot.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I became aware of the fact that I pedal my board when I put my 5mm Boiler Plate on my 170, which prevented me from doing so. I didn't like it on that board, I felt like I couldn't make the carves happen as usual. I do like the plate on my 185, where I guess my feet aren't doing as much. But my point is, I think pedaling is just a natural balance thing you learn to do subconsciously. I think if you deliberately try to do it while carving, you are going to forget to do something else important, and then you'll have bigger problems. But hey, give it a shot I guess. I think the ultimate goal is to not have to think about it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think if you deliberately try to do it while carving, you are going to forget to do something else important, and then you'll have bigger problems. But hey, give it a shot I guess. I think the ultimate goal is to not have to think about it.

That sums up my thoughts exactly. It's probably such a fine detail that it matters much less than proper angulation or whatever else is going on. Maybe it's something we develop (or not!) intuitively with positive feedback. I'm going to try to pay attention to it while riding this weekend. Maybe it's all that separates a great rider from a good rider!

Now, while sideslipping, I believe we exert a high level of control over the front and rear edge angles to control our angle to the fall line. I think that's why stopping is challenging with a stiff plate. It's not something that's taught, but we figure it out on our own.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You will be impressed, how much effect "pedaling" has. You can even do turns with only pedaling (and of course inclination, which is the only tool, that must be involved in any turn). As such I consider it just another tool next to rotation, angulation, forward-backward movement and vertical movement. Easy and intuitive to learn and apply.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Instead of pressuring your toe and heel, I look at it like this: drive your knees the direction you want to go and your board will follow. The harder you drive your knees into the snow and the direction you want to turn, the tighter the carve you will make. When conditions are very hard packed/icy, I've noticed the harder I drive my back leg knee into the snow, the better my edge will hold.

post-10456-14184241122_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Driving with your Mind is where it's at :)...I tried thinking about my feet on some turns today and went wait a minute...my Focus is on what is coming and where I want to go next... with anticipation and edge awareness feeding a path of least resistance...actually ones ability here plays a role...the more you practice the more relaxed you are, and so the more flow in your turns and transitions IMO...one way to get relaxed is to do the same exact run over and over till you become a Jedi :biggthump or Feel the turn your looking for...:o

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What DonPablo said, sort of. My newest board was pretty much kicking my arse until I started pedaling, especially on toeside turns. To tighten the turn, I drive my rear knee strongly toward the snow, which has the effect of twisting the board and sharpening the turn. Have to think about it though, as my other board (which I have been riding several years now) does not require such treatment.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

take a piece of paper, and cut a sidecut into one side of it, this represents the edge of your snowboard. now curve the paper as you would decamber a snowboard in a turn (tip and tail coming together) and note how the 'edge' becomes an increasingly smaller circle.

if, however, you twist the 'tip' and 'tail' away from each other in opposite directions, and yes this is an exaggerated example, you should see that what was a curved line starts to resemble a straighter one.

how this applies to pedalling i'm not sure. maybe it lets us engage the edge without turning?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks a lot for all of the answers! A lot of tips to think about/of.

I've never considered twisting the board: I'm just being curious about it since I saw that some plates allow the rider to twist the board. I asked myself: why should a "fix" plate be a limit? What can I earn in twisting the board?

That's where my question comes from.

I still have got many doubts about the use of "twisting" but... I will try something about, next time I'll be on the snow. :)

As a very strong summary, I could imagine that the more you twist a part of the board toward the snow, the most you "shorten" the sidecut of that part of the board.

I will reason about what this could bring into the carving... :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.



  • Recently Browsing

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...