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BTS - How's This Look?


barryj

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I bought these used last year and no complaints......set them up to mostly to be identical but today I noticed the rear (right foot) top springy is pushed away from the boot compared to the front foot and the adjustment seems to have changed slightly. My heeelside carves are railing more for me than my toe side. All we got out here in Cali. so far this season is groomers and on softened up groomers when I drop into a toeside carve I feel the nose kind off shovel in on toe side and pitch my weight forward for a second before I compensate. ........what do you guys see? Any suggestions? 6'2" 210lbs Virus Avy FLP AFT Here's some photos - URL=http://s267.photobucket.com/user/barryj01/media/IMG_0486.jpg.html]IMG_0486.jpg[/url]IMG_0488.jpg81801674-7165-4756-bc84-f13d1c4c03a1.jpg

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It appears the preload has you close to coil bind. Which means your forward flex will stop abruptly.

If that is the case, the next stiffer spring would provide a more even flex.

If the boot is too soft, you won't get feedback off the boot tongues as the nose of the board bites (primarily on a toeside), and that leads to a time lag between when the front begins to fold, and when you realize you need to do something about it.

May also be contributing to the lack of crisp v heel side.

Technique preferences aside, yellow seems a bit soft for a 'lever' of your listed stature.

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OK - Got a set of Blues - THANKS Wolf! Any words of wisdom to change out the springs? I assume I gonna have to pull the pins and remove the whole BTS from the boot. Right?...Also should I try to compress/adjust the blues to the same exact spot that the yellow springs have my boot at?? AKA: copy the lean and preload that I already have??Any pro/cons to changing out the springs one boot at a time? I'm thinking the rear foot first.

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Start with the front boot. If you like the forward lean you have at present, mark the cuff overlap with a sharpie or piece of tape, then replicate the original angle with the new springs. Take a run and fiddle with the preload as needed, keeping in mind that you will probably need to adjust both the top and bottom nuts to maintain 'static' forward lean angle.

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Hey Beckman,I bow to your wisdom, but what's the thinking with starting the Spring change over with the front foot?I would of thought the rear foot first to dial in the "generaly speaking , the rear foot should have more flex than the front" statement?

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^No need for 'three through seven', inclusive.

Most everyone has their own algorithm for boot/binding configuration, based on their own ideas on how things are supposed to work.

I start with the front foot, partly because I spend a lot of time riding around one-footed, and make the assumption that if I configure to ride easily with one foot, riding with two should be an absolute cinch.

I.e., I'm not covering up some front foot performance/handling deficiency with the rear foot.

Also, I don't want/need much travel in the front, which means I can set that boot at the desired forward lean, plus a slight amount of forward travel, and then move on to other things.

You may find with the blue springs 'stabilizing' the front foot, and the yellow in the back, that you become more aware of what each foot is contributing to the process. And that might inform further adjustments.

Or you may find something altogether different.

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OK - Marked my forward lean on the shell and changed out the springs on the front foot only. I set it the blues to match where the yellows were tightened down to.Now - what I don't know is which spring on the front foot to tighten/loosen based on what I'm experiencing/feeling on the snow. Any rule of thumb in this situation??

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Generally speaking, you won't gain anything by allowing the 'center' of your front knee to move 'back of' the pivot axis of your ankle joint (Viewed side to).

Set the preload on the lower spring to discourage this relationship during 'normal' operations, then set the upper spring to balance the tension on the lower spring such that you wind up close to the desired forward lean setting. Then take a few runs and see what kind of feedback you get off the front cuff.

When you load the shovel hard on a toeside, you should realize this by way of simultaneous pressure increase at both the boot tongue/shin and plantar forefoot. If you get one before the other, then you need to add/subtract preload.

Or something like that. Assuming all other variables have been accepted for, and you're not riding like a complete goof.

Then work on the rear boot until the system feels 'balanced'.

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OK - took the blues out for a spin - actually just the front/yellow on the back.We had 3-4 inch of new cover over night and usually with even that little amount of new snow I would shovel in some on my toesides.Not this time! Even with the soft conditions I was still able to hold my line like it was just groomed! Also I was able to be more agressive even in the chop.The only drawback was that my rear foot/yellow spring calf muscle got destroyed! I had to stop a couple hours (10am) into the the day and get my boot off and walk around barefoot in the lodge to stretch it out.Never had that happen before. My boot wasn't any tighter than any other time.Is this some tell tale sign that I'm overpressuring the rear/yellow spring? What do the experts say?

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Previously, when the nose engaged, you would pitch forward and the boot cuffs would give way, releasing the energy from the system.

With the front boot stabilized, the original 'fuse' (boot collapse) is gone.

Now, the stiffer front boot maintains the bend in the board, against which your momentum collides as the arc of the board tries to change your line of travel. If the rear boot is too soft in flex, you will be 'catching' yourself on the 'toes' of the rear foot.

Thus the calf workout.

Now that you know what an 'unbalanced system' feels like, change out the rear springs. Set the preload lighter than the front, but with enough tension that you feel resistance at the rear cuff before you feel tension on the calf muscle.

Edited by Beckmann AG
gesundheit.
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Beckman,Thanks for the info and direction.I'm a visual person...I'm going to set the blue spring on the rear boot to match (via photo) where the the rear boot yellow spring setting was......which was set somewhat softer than the yellow front. Will that work to :"Set the preload lighter than the front, but with enough tension that you feel resistance at the rear cuff before you feel tension on the calf muscle".

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Ok, try this:

Slack off the spring tension on the rear boot.

Boots on, lock into both bindings and stand comfortably, evenly weighted on both feet.

Mark the forward lean of the rear cuff on the shell.

Swap out the rear springs for the blue, set upper and lower springs for 'neutral tension' with the cuff lined up with your mark.

Add another 2 turns to the upper preload, ride it, then season to taste.

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Well Timmy, you can do that, and it might work famously.

However, you will be comparing an apple to an orange, or in this case, bananas to blueberries.

While it may be tempting to compare spring preload by measure of captured length, what you are after, after all, is effect.

And effect may have no regard for measure.

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BMan,You offer such pearls of wisdom........but how do I "set upper and lower springs for 'neutral tension'" step by step, per se?This Right?Top Spring = preloadBottom Spring = forward leanI want the preload to be less than the front but the forward lean to match front foot?

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Top Spring = preloadBottom Spring = forward leanI want the preload to be less than the front but the forward lean to match front foot?

More or less, though the springs need to adjust against each other as well as with respect to the shell/cuff.

If you mark the shell of the rear boot for the desired forward lean, and then wind both upper and lower springs to align the cuff with the mark, then the tension/(compression) is balanced, or neutral, despite one spring being longer than the other.

On the rear boot, you will probably want a bit more forward lean than the front. You may also want more forward flex than the front. However, that forward flex should 'ramp up' (stiffen) as travel increases. (Rather than ending abruptly.) The preload on the upper spring, combined with the spring rate, determines how stiff and how much flex you get. The lower spring, Working to balance the compression of the upper spring will then be used to establish the 'start point'. Hopefully with the bottom edge of the cuff lined up with your forward lean mark.

Clear?

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