Jump to content

Who is a Certified Instructor


Guest Matt D
 Share

Recommended Posts

Sup to all on BOL

I'm just wondering who on here is or was a certified snowboard instructor.

Some optional info you could give, would be what certifications you have, and what level. How many years? Who certified you (organization)?

So I am a Certified Instructor, in Canada,and I am certified by CASI (Canadian Association of Snowboard Instructors). I have my Level 3 course completed but am not a fully certified 3 until I get my Level 1 Freestyle. I also have a level 1 Alpine Coach, and I'm a level 1 Evaluator.

This will be my 5th season riding/5th season teaching, an I aspire to be a Professional Snowboarding Coach.

Matt

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest alpine168

4th season riding

1st season teaching.

I got a gig at Chicopee this season because it right close to my day job.

:D Can't wipe goofy grin off my face because first run coming soon, and it gonna rock.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am an AASI level III from Ski Roundtop, PA. I have been teaching since 1996. Of course, the important thing is that I took the LII and LIII exams on F2 Speedsters, Bomber bindings, and UPS Mach RSV's. I would encourage anyone else to do the same (alpine setup, that is). I believe that it was a good way to have diversity in the exams.

It was important to show that such a setup was optimal for the freestyle tasks at hand. (right?)

It is good to hear from you guys north of the border.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I did my CASI Level I last season with Alpine168, and we had a Jolly good time.

I took the course on my Renntiger. It was a little trickier to do some of the teaching demonstrations in the hard setup. If I were going to actually teach I'd need to get a softie setup, and so I don't really expect to teach much either. It was an excellent way to refine my own riding.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Matt. I was the snowboard school director at waterville valley from 93-95 before that I ran the snowboard school at temple mtn were I was in charge of every thing snowboardy! I also coached a privite scholl race team while i was in high school and for a few years after. I also was the first guy to ever teach snowboarding at Park City as well as a PC team rider for years. I was the TV instrutor for KSL channel 5 in Salt lake for the ski UT show as well.

I have done almost all of my teaching and coaching in hard boot unless the client wanted soft boot spacific instruction. I also had some input on the minirider program devoloped by ski wee. I stopped teaching when i started racing Pro. I have consider going back but like to ride to much and hate line ups! I know plenty of level 3 guys who turn like my Grandma. But a few who rip as well. I have never held any Cert. And used to give all the Clinics at evey mtn. I worked at. Many PC level 3s come to me with ?'s i ussaly just take them riding and fix their problems.

No Cert can be a big problem now days so continue with it!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Pre School Rider

Matt,I've been teaching since the '88 season.I'm an L-3 AASI(Certified in '99,in hardshells) instructor,now looking very carefully at USASA for the next step in my credentials.I've been a member of USASA previously as a Judge(VSSA,Green Mountain Series,and also was an ISF Referee). After 16 years,I've come to realize that in the U.S.,politics matter more than Riding/Pro Knowledge/Teaching ability.Also,money is controlled by the greed within the resort's management,so putting my money into the coffers of entities like AASI has been a waste,as it rarely paid off in professional respect at the Corporate Level.It would be nice if one could present their accomplishments and qualifications,and get a representitive salary for the expertise offered,but it ain't like that. One of the older Ski Instructors I've had the pleasure of working around noted that at one time,the Skiers paid the Instructors,and then the Instructors gave the Hill a cut of the pie.Nowadays,instructors have to be either foolhardy,or independantly wealthy to eek out a living on the crumbs offered up by the resort corporations. This will change only once organizations like AASI/PSIA actually quit sponsorring a monopoly that the corporate resorts now mostly enjoy,and start supporting their members. Meanwhile,I'll take a break from being the Gerbil in the paddlewheel,and start looking for a way outa the Corporate Cage.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That might show that you are a good husband moreso than a good instructor (although I am sure that you are a good instructor too). Good husbands are harder to come by than good instructors. During the season, I see nasty situations with couples every day. I really believe that it says a lot about a relationship when one can learn from their significant other - and the significant other can be worthy of the trust involved with that responsibility.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Started teaching in Colorado in 82 and am a PSIA level III, AASI level III, and just got a CASI level II race coach cert this spring. I am rather disappointed in the way AASI has turned their back on the alpine world but I do see some value in doing the occasional clinic and get some good tidbits from their mag.

It is rather unfortunate that you have to either go broke or have a "real" job to be able to afford all the training.

I also have a PADI card, drive a GLX and do my banking with USAA.

I'm sure there must be a twelve step program out there for folks like me...:p

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well Actually, I owned a resort. It was called Raven Mountain in the Kirkland Lake area of Ontario. While I was there, I got my CSIA level 1, CASI level 1 and Freestyle coach level 1. I helped out the ski school with teaching and we had a CASI level 3 on the mountain too. I havent recertified in years, but I kinda wish I moved on with the training not to instruct but to better my riding. Nothing beats a week or weekend with an instructor and a small class.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by d b

I'm certifiable.... whoops I mean I'm certified but haven't taught sense 1991. So my question is why would aasi turn their back on alpine snowboarding??

What makes you think they have? If you read my post above, I took my level III on an alpine setup. Not only did I pass, but they held my presentation until all of the LII's and LIII's were given out, and then they made a special presentation to me prefacing the presentation with "It is always extra sweet to see someone pass on an alpine setup." That does not sound like they have turned their back. They also had gates setup for part of our exam. We had to teach different racing methodology, running gates, etc. Of course, they didn't let me teach it, thinking that I may have had an affinity to racing (which I don't). But we were tested on our racing skills, knowledge, and teaching.

Don't get me wrong, they are not stressing alpine. Who would expect them too. They have an industry to cater to, and, lets face it, the industry is not heading toward alpine SB'ing.

So my question to you is: Where do you get the idea that they have turned their back on alpine?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rob Baker is the only one on the Demo team that I know of. That does not mean there are not more. I know of quite a few examiners that ride hardboots, but not necessarily as their primary setup. Again, the issue is whether they have turned their backs on alpine, not whether that is their riding method of choice. I believe that if an alpiner would get to that level, they would most likely be able to go further in the organization. As it stands, none of the LIII alpine boarders have chosen to step up. Again, they are catering to the industry, and the industry is not headed that direction.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Point well taken Phil. I think the problem with lack of AASI involvement with the alpine world is twofold:

First of all, even amongst the credentialed crowd that does ride plates, there are no folks at the DCL level and above really doing anything to promote hardbooting because the whole focus of the organization is to promote freeriding oriented topics. This has been the norm for some time and I have heard at least a few guys state that they were told not to show up for upper level exams on plates. Don't know when the last person passed a level III on alpine gear, but I wouldn't be suprised if it happened in the last millenium.

Secondly, in its defense, AASI thinks it is doing a good job of catering to the public's needs, as there is no perceived demand for alpine related instruction. I believe their view in this respect is way too shortsighted. Just look at folks like Fin and Sean who are filling a void created by the departure of the bigger outfits. Since their sales numbers are up, these people must be going somewhere with the gear, and unless we do something to make their introduction to it a safe and enjoyable one, this sport will continue to be marginalized.

The reason I attended the Canadian CASI program was not to collect more letters next to my certs, but to acknowledge, suppport and bring back a few pointers from a program created for and taught by current alpine riders. In the meantime it will take more of us guys with teaching and coaching backgrounds - certified or not - to get more folks on the hill as well as challenge AASI to devote more attention to the alpine side of their "Y" model. And it is possible - I have run a few well received clinics at Crystal to put some of the SB staff on plates, and this week the company I coach for will be working with 14 alpine riders, 5 of which are women and 4 of which are first time plate riders. We just need more people banging the drum...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest alpine168

To add to that, as Matt D mentioned, Level 3 would require park and pipe riding in the form of a Level 1 Freestyle Coach Cert.

To get Level 2 need to ride switched and demonstrate intermediate carving with textbook form. I think there used to be a requirement of minimum 1 year teaching experience with a club to get Level 2, but I can't find that mentioned this year.

From progressing through from CASI Level 1 toward CASI Level 4, the riding skills required are quite diverse ... but CASI don't make you ride plates until the last level.

If CASI makes candidates ride plates as part of certification earlier, then I think maybe there would be more instructors on plates, and maybe the kids would pick up riding plates from the instructors.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Level 1 race coach deals with both Alpine and BX racing. You must be able to carve consistently on Blue terrain. You can ride hard or soft boots. On my course there were 5 with hard boots, and 1 in soft.

Also, as Alpine168 mentioned, to get your CASI IV you must be proficient in both hard and soft boots. There are quite a few instructors in Canada that ride and teach on plates though. Most are in quebec and speak french, so most wouldn't be able to participate here at BOL.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

USSA level 1 alpine coaching - Race focused, a skiers course with tactical value for snowboarders

USSA Technical delegate/Official's license

ISF National level Judges - Expired 2002

USASA level 2 (regional) Coaches certificate.

Looking to schedule USASA instructors clinic at my home hill, as AASI is a much more cumbersome schedule procedure.

Starting a team my new home mountain after building the Mount Sunapee for 4 years...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share



  • Recently Browsing

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...