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Cuff canting: how and why?


nekdut
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I have a pair of Raichle SB123s and I've been told that these have adjustable cuff canting adjusters. How do I change the cant of the cuff? And more importantly, how much should I be adjusting them? I have pretty pronated feet due to flat feet (no arch whatsoever!). Any suggestions please? Thanks in advance!

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Guest Andrew S

To be honest, I have never been able to figure out in the last 2 years just how the canting built into the af600 works? Anyone wanna give me a quick lesson? I guess I just never really thought about it, or rather tried to figure it out. Thanks..

Andrew

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Most boots have allen bolts on both sides of the hinge point of the boot. These can be loosened to allow the cuff to be moved medially ( twds the center of your body) or laterally ( away from it ). Bob's and Kent's advice is great - just remember to loosen all the bolts and have a friend or shop guy adjust them with your foot in the shell. FWIW I run cants in my ski gear which I feel is critical, but don't particularly mess around with my SB boots because they work great as is. And I do run custom footbeds in all my ski and SB gear ( a nod to Kent's spot on footbed rant.)

If you begin to develop a hot spot against the side of your lower calf, chances are you would benefit from a canting adjustment. Because of the variation in binding cants and lifts as well as the greater flexibility of SB boots I don't feel that the canting issue is quite as critical as with skis, but there are definitely folks with alignment issues that could certainly benefit from a bit of tweaking of the hooves.

Best bet- get with a knowledgeable rider/trainer who can not only look at the static picture in the shop, but also see how it affects your riding.

Hope this helps - Sean

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I haven't seen the specific boot models you're talking about here, and I can't find a web picture of the 123s. Most of the Raichle jobbies have a couple of allen keyed bolts on each side of the ankle, set in the centre of grey plastic disks. On my 225s you just loosen the bolts and then the disks can slide about in a slot bounded by a white plstic thing. Set the angle and then lock them. The reason I know how they fit together is that they break and you have to fix them.

To me boot cant adjustment is a waste of time for snowboards; a throwback to the ski-boot lasts the things are based on. Then again I don't have funny knees. I set the things to the place they look strongest (at the bottom of the slots) and leave them there.

Using cant or toe and heel lift on the bindings is easier, IMHO, although forward lean adjusters on boots are useful.

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I have an unorthodox use for those things: by changing both cant adjusters in the same direction at the same time, you can adjust your forward lean. I like to ride with one boot locked and the other in that "1-3" mode (where you can flex it between settings 1 and 3 but not straighten it to 4 and 5). By adjusting both cant adjusters up or down, I can change how much forward lean the boot has when it is on the "3" setting.

BTW - the cant adjusters sometimes strip out, and you'll have to do this: http://www.bomberonline.com/Forums/Thread.cfm?CFApp=2&Thread_ID=2819

Originally posted by nekdut

I have a pair of Raichle SB123s and I've been told that these have adjustable cuff canting adjusters. How do I change the cant of the cuff? And more importantly, how much should I be adjusting them? I have pretty pronated feet due to flat feet (no arch whatsoever!). Any suggestions please? Thanks in advance!

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nekdutSo with my SB123s, i just loosen the allen sockets on both sides to adjust the cant? I've tried to unscrew them before and it feels like I'm going to break something if i turn any harder. Is it supposed to be that tight?

Yes, that's all you do, and they might be quite tight as they have to be to hold it together. If they're old though they might be rusted up or something, in which case you're obviously taking a risk messing with them. IIRC the bolts themselves are easily replaced locally, it's the plates they bolt into you don't want to strip. Guess which is easiest to strip ;-)

MikeWhere did you get the replacement parts when they broke? and which parts actually broke on the boots?

There are pictures of the broken bits somewhere in the old forums, but specifically it was the white plastic bits which broke. I then trashed one of the four t-nut things whilst extracting the bolts, which inevitably had frozen up. The original break was on my front boot as a result of an ankle-breaking pearl at high speed on a glacier... not something I'd care to repeat.

Replacements: I live in the uk, so the closest place for carving gear is Austria:

Blue Tomato

You need to mail them directly and explain what you want. I now have a small bag of spare bits, although in the three seasons since I did that damage I've had no trouble with the adjusters.

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