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Best angle for the bindings


Guest Surfer_D
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Guest Surfer_D

Hi Guys,

I'm riding F2 silberpfeil and F2 bindings.

1. What angled do you recomend for the 1st and 2nd binding

2. I got 2 piccies of plastic to lift the heel or toe. How do you recomend to use them. To lift the back heel on the back binding and toe on the front binding or should I use it just for the rear foot.

Any help is apprechiated. I tried various setups, but I just can't find the right one. Maybe my boots are bad - Reichle 323

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The best place to start for angles is with your toes and heels as close to the edge as possible without hanging over. This gives you maximum balancing leverage across the board, while avoiding toe/heel drag. You can experiment from there, but you don't want any overhang - unless you are a beginner and won't be tilting the board up that high. Then you can go a few degrees less.

As for lifts, you're right, some toe lift on the front foot and heel lift on the back is good. Some people ride a flat front foot. See what you like.

There is an article on setting up bindings in the Tech Articles here.

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Rule of thumb for alpine binding setup: rear binding to minimum angle, which does not cause boot overhang from edges, front binding 6-9 degrees more.

About lift for heel or toe: it depends and you should try to find out, what works best for you. Some ride without any lift or cant, some prefer wider stance with front foot toe and rear foot heel lift. Generally using lift (and canting) allows for more wider stance than without. Additionally at least for me worked rear heel lifting, if I wanted to ride with boots locked (i.e. not in walk position), without lift I banged my shin and was unable to bend my knees. But now I'd probably use on Silberpfeil similar setup as on Swoard: narrower stance and without any lift or cant, boots unlocked or with soft RAB.

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Originally posted by Vahur

Rule of thumb for alpine binding setup: rear binding to minimum angle, which does not cause boot overhang from edges, front binding 6-9 degrees more.

Only do this if you are extraordinarily duck-footed. 6 to 9 degrees is a <i>large</i> difference. I would say 0 to 3 (maybe 5) is typical for someone with normal bone structure. More than that, and your knees will be fighting each other. You want your knees working in unison, and this usually happens with very little difference in stance angle.

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Originally posted by Jack Michaud

Only do this if you are extraordinarily duck-footed. 6 to 9 degrees is a <i>large</i> difference. I would say 0 to 3 (maybe 5) is typical for someone with normal bone structure. More than that, and your knees will be fighting each other. You want your knees working in unison, and this usually happens with very little difference in stance angle.

What is the benefit of a smaller angle in back? I used to ride at 60/60 but now that so many people have suggested 3-5 less in back, i ride at 60/55...

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THis was explained to me but someone like Jack probably has a stronger (and better) opinion.

1. You naturally stand with a slight difference between the feet 3-5 degrees

2. The additional leverage off a slightly flatter back foot helps drive out of turns, especially toe sides.

What I have noticed; when I used to ride face the nose style, then the back foot angle could be higher with heel lift mandatory. When I ride Swiss super rotation style (not sure how to call this but this is what I was taught by Swiss racer coach guy) for cruising around the hill, the heel lift seemed less necessary, because I was now flexing along the angle of the boots, rather than with my hips facing forward more than the angle of the back foot (if that makes sense).

I have never ridden angles higher than 55 degrees; for me it is 55 front, 50 back; I used to ride 51 49 and the slightly bigger differential seems to help power through the end of the turn on the toe side.

Mind you; about 4 years since I last rode, and it could all be different now ;-)

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I used to ride at 60/60 but now that so many people have suggested 3-5 less in back, i ride at 60/55...

I used to ride 63/57. A very good carver at tahoe said he was using 60/60 (you know who you are) and I started experimenting and changed mine to 60/60 too and suddenly I had so much more balance and control.

The biomechanic of every person is different because of his/her body mass and habbits of joint/muscle movements. I'd say there is no holy degree prescription and everyone should find his own comfortable zone and fine tune it from there,...experiment, practice and fine tune again to find your "ideal" stance and degrees.

just my 0.0002 cents

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Originally posted by moxie

What is the benefit of a smaller angle in back? I used to ride at 60/60 but now that so many people have suggested 3-5 less in back, i ride at 60/55...

Nothing other than comfort, if it works for you. From 0 to 5 degrees of difference is just personal preference. Beyond 5 is inadvisable for average build people due to the stress it puts on your knees, and the fact that it limits your mobility.

Some people even ride with slightly more angle on the back foot, even if they aren't naturally pidgeon toed. It just works for them. Mark Fawcett used to do this.

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Originally posted by Jack Michaud

Only do this if you are extraordinarily duck-footed. 6 to 9 degrees is a <i>large</i> difference.

Yep, you're right and I stand corrected, I pulled this 6-9 out from nowhere. haven't ridden board since March and forgot everything I knew about .., ugh, snowboarding, and then some more.:D

Of course some people like quite extraordinary angles (like 55/25) on quite extraordinary boards (like asym #one), but lets not make things too complicated for thread initiator :cool:

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Guest boogieman

the more angle you use the easyer it gets to carve and the harder it gets to skid or put the brakes on

i ride at 60 58 works fine for me and like everyone said already the difference between front and back foot is just to make it more confortable for you, so it depends of your body structure

and i have also f2 bindings and i put the big block on the heel of my rear binding and the small one on the toe of my front binding and inward cant on the back foot

i suggest you try it like that to start with

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I have the F2 bindings, but how I set them depends on the boots.

(1) with Ski boots I rode flat.

(2) With Rachlie 225s (race tongues) I rode the minimum toe/ heel lift, which I think is one degree each (you take the two little cants and insert them back-to-back to make a straight lift).

(3) I just changed names along with Rachlie to some "deeluxe" Indy boots. These have a different flex pattern and adjustmeent. I found that 1 degree toe lift is still ok on the front with minimum lean on the boot, but with one degree on the heel of the back foot I couldn't "get my knee down". A day's riding gave me a red shin on the back leg. I stuck the next smallest lift in there, which looks like about 6 degrees. Anyway, that fixes it... my knee is now officially where I want it to be and all is well with the world. Binding wise anyway: my gods deliver.

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