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Boardercross tips


quest4powder
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I'm planning on entering some boardercross races this season, and am looking for tips to help me compete successfully. Would anyone here be able to offer some suggestions on BX racing or training?

Are there any dvds, videos, or websites with BX tips? Camps or clubs that specialize in BX?

Thanks for any help you might be able to offer...

________

DA BUDDHA VAPORIZER

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I would suggest going out, and riding in Sub-par conditions whenever possible. The courses get torn up quick. This will also help you when you get those wonderful little "love taps" from your competitors. Basically, BX is becoming more of a survival race than a precision/speed race.

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Guest River Rat
Hey Neil, if that was a "better off dead" reference......I WANT MY TWO DOLLARS!

... You see, my grandmother dropped acid and hijacked a bus load of penguins ... so its really not a good time right now.

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Guest River Rat
Hey Neil, if that was a "better off dead" reference......I WANT MY TWO DOLLARS!

... You see, my grandmother dropped acid and hijacked a bus load of penguins ... so its really not a good time right now.

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Guest River Rat

but, if I were to enter one and had to guess as how to best prepare my riding skill set to succeed I would do the following:

I would ... wait. Before I tell you where I stand, let me first tell you where I sit. My impression of a BX race is that it is about going as fast as possible (it is a race after all) down ****ty conditions bumpin', etc. Basically skirting the edge of control. Now where I stand. Ride that way. You want to prepare? Here is my suggestion, and it is only that. Find yourself a nice forgiving carving board, the kind that the elite of this sport would mock you for as a beginner board and take it EVERYWHERE, as fast as possible. Forget all of the minutae you hear about when it comes to stance, angles, etc. and set it up so it is comfortable and under your control on everything from perfect cord to iced out 40 degree moguls the size of them cars that look the same goin' forward as they do goin' backward (VW bug). Don't get me wrong, you want to carve perfect carves on cord that minutae is important, but BX, as well as all mountain riding, is a different ball game.

You want to compete in a BX? Find the ugliest run on your hill and see how fast you can go down it without hurting yourself. If you hurt yourself, you went too fast and that is that chance you take. Skirt that edge of control.

A wise man once said, " Go that way, really, really fast. If something gets in your way - turn".

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If you ride a bike, get to a BMX track during the summer. I have found that this is great cross training for BX. If your local track has a scheduled practice time, go then and eavesdrop on the coaches to hear what they are telling their team. There is a lot to be learned there. (I would imagine that moto-x would also be helpful) Skateparks that have continuous lines or courses are also really good practice during the summer.

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I seem to remember the commentators at last year's X-games mentioning that it was helpful to land as high on the transition as possible on the tabletops as it allows you to start higher on the hill and thus generate more speed.

Do I have this correct? Even though snow is faster than air, there are some features that you have to air off. And the trick, it would seem, would be to control the amount of 'pop' you get to land high on the transition--at 40+ mph and in a crowd.

________

korean girl Webcam

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Sounds correct to me. While airborne you're accelerating downward, but not forward. Some of the downward speed you gain does become forward speed, but not all of it. However when you're on snow, gravity is basically giving you forward speed, so you want to do that sooner rather than later. But don't undershoot... that could leave you airborne (or close to it) for much of the landing ramp, and there goes your chance to get more forward speed. (Not to mention, it can hurt.)

When I was in junior high I did a little bit of BMW racing, and in my first race I beat some friends who were really faster than me. I just kept the bike on the ground while they were getting air. Learned that trick from ski racing commentators on TV. :)

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Pumping is working the transitions of the jumps (either down or up) to generate more speed. If you've ever skateboarded ramps or pools, you use pump to gain height on the walls. Pumping an upward transition will result in more air, I think. Pre-jumping is used to avoid getting thrown in the air by a jump you don't want to take.

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