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New carver needs binding advice


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Hi. I have been carving for a couple of years. I won't say that I'm very good at it, but I'm learning as I go. Up to now, I've used traditional boots and bindings, so my carving leaves room for improvement. I want to make the transition to hard boots and bindings, but don't want to drop big $$ for a setup. I have some ski boots that I want to use for now. Anybody got recomendations for a good, cost-effective type of binding to look at?

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I think a used set of Catek World Cup (not Olympic) would work great for ski boots (under $100). They come in short plate and long plate, so get the right size. Size 9 and up would be long plate.

You might want to buy some Raichle 413's and a set of X-bones. Snowboard boots are stronger for carving than ski boots.

good luck,

Hugh

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David,

These guys are correct, we HIGHLY do not recommend starting out with ski boots. Not saying you cannot do it, but they are extremely stiff in comparison to a snowboard hardboot and will make the learning curve "rough" to say the least.

Obviously I might be bias as I sell hardboots ;) but we have seen people "try" alpine snowboarding with ski boots, get bucked like a bronco, and swear to never do it again.

Let me know if you have any other question on boot selection,

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I'm a crossover skier who learned how to carve on ski boots. It is possible, but it is much easier and your progress will be faster with snowboard specific boots.

If you do go with ski boots (And you are fit) you might have the most luck setting very high stance angles. A friend of mine still uses ski boots, and he is most successful at angles between 65-70 degrees.(Maxed-out on TD1 bombers, I think.)

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Guest AlpentalRider

I started on old Lange XSI ski boots (these were high end ski boots in their day). I didn't have alot of problems picking it up, but I did notice I had to be EXACT in all my movements, and the limiting range of mobility really made me alter my riding style to have it work. Not to mention you will get shin bang and all kinds of other problems due to the unnatural positioning of your legs compared to how a ski boot is designed to be ridden.

Now that I have real snowboard boots (Deeluxe Suzukas) I can honestly say the difference is night and day. Everything is so much easier now and I don't have to be precise like I was in the ski boots.

So like everyone else said, investing in a good pair of snowboard hardboots is going to be key, and may prevent you from picking up bad habits due to the using ski boots.

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can be had in the Bomber store. I just bought a set of 413's which for a beginer seem to be nice boots. My wife and I have the same size foot so as a test I tried her Salomon Ski boots in my Olympics and all I can say is OWWWW...the tongue/upper cuff of Ski boots is really uncomfortable on on a snowboard. Now is the time to buy used and or last years gear at a discount...

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Originally posted by DavidTickner

Hi. I have been carving for a couple of years. I won't say that I'm very good at it, but I'm learning as I go. Up to now, I've used traditional boots and bindings, so my carving leaves room for improvement. I want to make the transition to hard boots and bindings, but don't want to drop big $$ for a setup. I have some ski boots that I want to use for now. Anybody got recomendations for a good, cost-effective type of binding to look at?

What size are your feet. I may have boots and bindings that will work great (as long as they fit).

kt

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Hi David.

I've got a set of 26cm Raichle 124s. Conventional Raichle wisdom says you can typically go 1cm down from your measured foot for a good fit.

I got the boots as part of a package deal at a swap meet and will sell them for $25+shipping. I can take a picture if you'd like.

A couple of notes:

-These are the old style 124s that are *not* INTEC compatible.

-The shells are in good shape, but the liners are just marginal. They are servicable but not great. They aren't stinky though. :)

-The cuff cant mechinisms were stripped out when I bought them, so I replaced them with some spares.

-All buckles and straps are in good shape.

-They have the 1-position walk/ride lever, not the 5-position forward lean adjuster.

-They are a 4 buckle boot.

Mark

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Kriss,

By far the best method to make sure you get the correct boot size is to measure the lenght of you foot in cm. This number is now your Mondo Point. So if you measure a 26cm then you are a M26 boot size.

Typically (and we suggest), you round down, so if you measure 26.8cm you are still a M26 boot. The ThermoFlex liners found in most our boots are amazing in allowing the shell to fit you. However, keep one thing in mind...

UNMOLDED LINERS WILL FEEL VERY SMALL

The liner does not fit properly until it is molded.

We also offer a 30 day return policy so you can exchange the boot if needed.

Contact us at bomber@bomberonline.com for more help on all this.

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I broke a few cheap bindings and would not recommend them to anybody anywhere near my weight (170ish around the time I was breaking bindings, closer to 180 now that I'm riding (and not breaking) Bombers). Buying cheap = buying twice. Breaking bindings is scary stuff too, you risk breaking the one leg that's still attached to the board.

Riding in ski boots will put even more stress on the binding than riding in 'hard' snowboard boots.

So, I join the others in recommending some some used Bombers or Cateks. I would rather riding used bindings from those companies than brand new bindings from any other company. Seriously. They're tough enough that so long as they're intact they're basically as good as new. Even brand new, bindings from other companies are not as strong.

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Regular bindings will be ok for starting. By regular, I mean with at least with an aluminium plate like SnowPros/F2 Race/Burton Performance. I've been riding my Burton Performance bindings since 1998 without any issues, but I don't ride as hard as many here (and I was 185, dropped to 170).

Cateks and Bombers are bombproof, but some may find them a bit stiff (even if Bob will come and say the TD2 E-ring helps). I've never tried any of them, but this is according with what I read here.

Derf

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... and that leads to broken bindings, especially if you are a big guy. At least that was the case for me. I started with a pair of Nitro Razors and broke them after 3 days if I remember right.

I recommend starting out with TD2s or Cateks as well. They just won't break. If you can find 'em used, great; but they do have good resale value; the difference in price between a new set of TD2s and a used set is often less than the difference between a new pair of Burtons and a broken pair of Burtons :p

I second bobdea's suggestion of just using a softer boot. For example the Raichle 413, or even a 423/LeMans. (Or for those with teeny feet - get the 225's for $50 from the Bomber store, and then pick up a set of soft tongues for them for an extra $15, softens 'em right up)

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