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New vs Used vs NOS...


tex1230
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Ok...we all want a nice shiny new custom metal board..but we don't all have the budget.

so the choice becomes New, Used, or the mysterious New Old Stock.

I'd love the board makers (and anyone else) to chime in here, but my own thinking is this:

I will Never, Ever again buy a board older than 5 years unless it's a collector's piece. That goes for Used and NOS. after 5 years, I'd say that any used board is going to be dead, and any NOS board becomes dangerous due to the natural breakdown of the plastics and core materials. I'm not a chemist or an engineer, but I know that most of these boards, when new, are good for one or two seasons of continuous riding, then they're pretty much spent. So I would guess that the manufacturers are not that concerned with making a product with an infinite shelf life.

If you're not ready to spend $1000+ on a new custom metal board or $700ish on non-metal, you still have several options:

There are plenty of good new boards available in the $400-$600 price range, especially at the end of the season and mid summer tent sales. most of these are less than a year old.

There are always a ton of boards lightly used in the classifieds here and other sites, and ebay, that are in the $100 - $400 range. most of these are 1-3 years old, and if you've been here for any length of time you know that most of us are extremely anal about our tuning, so chances are if you buy a board here you'll be getting one that was properly maintained.

I would much rather ride a $160 beat up rock board that is 3-5 years old than buy a NOS Burton alp from the 1990's for $160... not knowing if the thing's going to snap on me because the plastic and epoxy layers have separated over the years...

Just thinking...I'd love to hear from the chemists and board builders if my thinking is wrong...

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Day after Thanksgiving, 2004, I went on an impromptu day trip to Waterville Valley with some friends. All my "current" gear was left up at Sugarloaf. Luckily I had my '96 Factory Prime 167 and an old pair of boots at home. The FP had at least 100 days on it, I had used it for instructing, and the top sheet was actually buckling in front of the front binding.

I had no idea how the stuff was going to ride. Much to my surprise, I had a great time on it. If the price was right, I wouldn't turn my nose up at NOS for freecarving.

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I think it's more a matter of technological advances than it is board age. The 167 FP I remember from 1996 rides just like it did then - the board has been well taken care of. The big change is in materials and process - improvements that make the newer stuff easier to ride and better performing at the same time.

If resin degrades how about all the older Corvettes, archery bows, and oh yeah the springs in corvettes are all fiberglass and resin too. Again, it's more how it's treated than how old it is. Of course, this is jsut my opinion based on personal observation. Maybe the board manufacturers would LIKE us to think that boards are not usable after two years - like they had a "best use before" date. They would get a lot more business from the replacement activity, and the used market here would dry up.

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End-of-season demo stock is the way to go to save $$$ and get up to date equipment.

Of couse, this is probably the worst time of year to say this... :angryfire

Oh, and I agree with what Jack said about NOS. I still have boards from the early '90's that I ride now and then for giggles....

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The active material in most boards being wood, I wouldn't expect it to degrade that much. If the board had been left out in the elements for years, then maybe it might be a problem, but stored in a dry basement, I'd think it would be fine as far as the epoxies go. They are designed to handle temperature extremes and outdoor conditions, after all.

My two Blasts are ten years old now, and they both still ride fine. That they'd come apart while I'm riding them is not something that ever crosses my mind. Plus I'm sure that there would be telltale signs long before that happened, and I check my gear every time I ride.

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I would very happily ride an original Madd 158 any day of the week - and I would imagine myself enjoying the ride more than most modern boards.

Madd is the exception to the norm though.

- Just sayin

There are alot of older board out there that ride better then most.

I have boards with tinkler plates, kildy plate,priors, burton race stock and secert team from years ago that still ride better then most new fiber stuff from several companys and they are a deacade+ old.

how about burners?? there a specail board, differnt ride then most.

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Old boards can still ride well as Bordy said. This past weekend I rocked a 163 dualtec Rossi while DT and Big Mario were using their newer stock. I rode as well and had just as much fun as they had.

In fact, all of the boards that I currently ride are my old race boards from 4+ years ago with many being way older than than that. Back in the days of racing Bordy and DFJ among others.

I don't have the funds to be scoring new decks all the time anymore with house projects and a kid who is learning to ride.

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I was going to say the same thing as everyone else. I have some old boards I'm happy to pull out and ride. It's also worth saying that new is no guarantee. I pulled the core through the top-sheet of a Ride once the first day I took it out. They were happy to swap it out (of course) but that's the only time I've really had a total failure, and the equipment was brand new.

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I will Never, Ever again buy a board older than 5 years unless it's a collector's piece. That goes for Used and NOS. after 5 years, I'd say that any used board is going to be dead, and any NOS board becomes dangerous due to the natural breakdown of the plastics and core materials.

Relax. I've crossed 2 oceans on 30 years old sailboat. It survived heavy pounding in hurricane strength winds during a winter crossing of Northern Pacific. And it's built in plyester resin, way lesser quality then epoxy that goes into boards.

Wood in the core is quite safe as long as it's sealed. Glass in the composite doesn't even have chemoical brakedown, again as long as dry. So, a NOS board nicely stored in a dry place would be still good for your children...

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I am so scared to read stuff like "thanks to so and so for selling me cheap outdated unsafe broken down boot so I could get into alpine riding" You would not sell your friend ski boots that are the same age etc.

But you'll help spread the stoke by risking some one elses heath and saftey to save a buck??????

There are people out there who will not even ride a brand of new boots becuase a web site said they may fail, but you'll set your buddy up on gear from the 90's????????????????

Just like the jokers pitching PJs for hundreds on e-bay do nothing for the sport so do all the unsafe outdated gear transactions by the cheap gear vacumes on the classifed world wide......

There are still guys riding Burton stock prodect who swear it the best crap ever......

I would rather ride new soft boot gear that carves circles around the crap that passes for alpine gear in the classified...

Spend some money on real alpine gear and help the sport grow give manufactures a chance to make prodects better buy making a profit.....

Don't buy old stuff. It's inherently dangerous.

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There for sure are some saftey issue when it comes to older used gear.... i hope everyone uses caution. And is honest with buyer .

Mostly plastic gear is what should be questionable. Old boots and Binding Parts etc.

And Jack will chime in as why asym should not be sould to any one as a "first time board" or primary ride.

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  • 1 month later...

There was recently an article in the magazine American Heritage of Invention and Technology (a really interesting read, btw) about fiberglas. I remember being surprised to read that the resin actually gets stronger over time--as opposed to metals, which gradually lose strength and become "fatigued" under continual loading.

That doesn't mean old boards might have something else suffer from aging or use--but I doubt it would be the resin.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I've got a Hot Logical 164 too,and it has more camber and pop than anything else I have and I beat the crap out of it years ago. My Alp that I bought new back in 99 shows no sign of dying. The only signs of aging I've seen on any boards, other than when they go dead and lose their camber, is discoloration in top sheets of abs, especially in white.

On other products, I got an old spinning rod my dad bought back in the 40's that is fiberglass and is just fine. And there are a lot of jetliners flying overhead with fiberglass and composite panels that were built in the 60's & 70's. The only thing that goes wrong is when the protective covering is damaged, either from erosion or impact and allows sun damage and/or moisture intrusion, which leads to delamination.

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