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Another Newbie Question


Guest StopDropandRoll
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Guest StopDropandRoll

Another Newbie Question

I too am trying to make the transition from soft boots to hard boots, but with a slightly different set of challenges than Zach. I don’t know anyone who rides hard boots and need all the help I can get. I think that I’m going to have to buy a complete setup unless you guys know how someone in <ST1:pNorthern California</ST1:p can try first without buying. I’m hoping if I describe what it is I’m looking for, you guys can point me in the right direction.

<O:p</O:p

Rider:

Instead of being 6’3” and around 220, I’m 5’9” and around 150. I’m not as interested in speed as much as I am in getting my hips to touch.

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Boots:

Using the guide in your FAQ, I measured my feet at 26.6cm. So I think I’m looking for a pair of used, Mondo size 26 with Thermo Flex liners and the ability to upgrade to Intec heels later. (I do not have the money to do this all at once, so it’s going to be one piece at a time)

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Bindings:

I don’t know enough about hard boot bindings to be very specific here. I like the idea of step in’s, but unfortunately this decision with be more price driven than anything else.

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Board:

Again referencing your FAQ, I measured my chin-nose at 158-162cm. So I think I’m looking for (and here is where I need to most help) a freecarve with around a 10m radius (guessing), narrow waist (maybe), medium stiffness (150lb guy looking to get low to the ground), with little to no taper (no clue). All specifications are approximations based on information I have gathered reading not riding. If I am way off, please let me know.

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I do have some concern that I should begin with an all mountain before advancing to a freecarve. It seemed the advice Zach was getting was to go on the stiffer side, but I don’t have as much experience as he does. Any advice on getting started, buying appropriate used gear, resources in <ST1:pNorthern California</ST1:p, etc. would be incredibly helpful to me. I apologize in advance if I frustrate anyone due to lack of budget. Thank you to anyone who replies.

<O:p</O:p

JBC

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I think that I’m going to have to buy a complete setup unless you guys know how someone in Northern California can try first without buying.[/Quote] Get in touch with The guys at Tahoecarvers
Instead of being 6’3” and around 220, I’m 5’9” and around 150. I’m not as interested in speed as much as I am in getting my hips to touch.
The two are not mutually exclusive. you need speed to get low and get back up.
I don’t know enough about hard boot bindings to be very specific here. I like the idea of step in’s, but unfortunately this decision with be more price driven than anything else[/Quote] You're only talking about a $60 price difference to get into step-ins assuming your boots are compatible, but I would advise against an intec system for a beginner as it is a much stiffer interface, allowing much less margin for error vs a traditional (standard) binding
a freecarve with around a 10m radius (guessing), narrow waist (maybe), medium stiffness (150lb guy looking to get low to the ground), with little to no taper (no clue). All specifications are approximations based on information I have gathered reading not riding. If I am way off, please let me know
You could go with a bigger SCR to start...just my opinion - but I like 12+ for freecarve
I do have some concern that I should begin with an all mountain before advancing to a freecarve. It seemed the advice Zach was getting was to go on the stiffer side, but I don’t have as much experience as he does. Any advice on getting started, buying appropriate used gear, resources in <ST1:pNorthern California</ST1:p, etc. would be incredibly helpful to me

the guy was a lot bigger than you with 23 years of riding. advice is not comparable. Freecarve is not "more advanced" than all mountain, it is simply different. If this is going to be your only setup, go all mountain. If you have a soft setup and this is a secondary board I'f go with a freecarve board to get you a better idea of what carving is about.

Fill out your profile, ask more questions...

You can easily get a basic setup for $300 if you watch the classifieds here. At your weight you don't need TD2s or Catek OS2s - you can do fine with snowpro/burton/etc and pick up a decent pair of boots and a board in the mid-160s. Also try Klug - he has(had?) a bunch of old burtond for sale cheap.

Good luck

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StopDropAndRoll,

How long have you been riding? Not to deter you from buying a hard setup, I think it is a great idea, but have you thought about trying to carve your soft deck? This year try placing your soft bindings at steeper angles than you alreasy have. Maybe about 40 front and 40 back. Try to turn by driving your knees. With todays harder soft boots and bindings you should have no problem carving your soft board. Good luck with the hard setup. Look at the want ad stuff on this site. You probably won't find a better deal any where.

Good Luck

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For brushing hips wouldn't it be more optimal to get a board with a wider waist and some softer boots, kinda like the EC guys do it? I also agree with the wider sidecut. A 10 leaves little time to actually get down to the ground before you have to transition back over your board. And given a board with the right stiffness you can really crank a 12 or 13 into one heck of a turn if needed.

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Freecarve boards are definitely more advanced than all-mountain boards. The square tail can catch and throw people off - I've witnessed this several times. I think a 9-11m radius is good for a beginner. Allows you to do fun carves at lower speeds on less steep trails. Can't learn anything in self-defense mode on steeps.

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I ride a lot at Tahoe,and always look for someone to ride with. I've got a pile of boards you could try, but I'm thinking Prior 4WD 169. Good transition from free ride to carving. When the snow hits, check out the ride board to hook up with carvers. Nothing will get you up to speed faster than riding with people better then you. I have learned a great deal from other riders. Once you move to hard boots you have joined the Brotherhood, and you will find that almost all the brothers are there to help.

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Guest StopDropandRoll

Thank you for all of the responses. I can’t tell you guys how great it is to find people willing to help someone get started.

I posted the same message with Tahoecarvers. I’m hoping for an opportunity to try some different setups and get better idea of what is going to work.

I also took a look at Klugriding and found a 1999 Burton Factory Prime 160cm for $160. It’s described as a “cosmetic second” with “blems in the graphics only”. The description is a little vague. Does anyone know about these boards? Is it worth it to spend $160 for a board made in 1999? Does it make more sense look for a newer used board? Thanks again for all the help.

JBC

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Absolutely. Those are great boards. Burton made way too many of those in the late 90's and couldn't sell them. Chris Klug was one of their team riders and he went out on his own and bought basically their whole factory overstock and sells it until he runs out.

The Factory Prime was basically Burton's attempt at making a commercially available racing board. Unfortunately, the snowboarding race community is tiny. The Ultra prime is basically one step away from the "most recent" technology that they put into their race line and it basically aimed at being a common man's alpine board that won't be as deadly stiff and GS-course specific as a FP. It will be a bit more forgiving around the mountain whereas the Factory Prime has one purpose: to race.

The downside of race boards are the same things that make them what they are. It's that they are long, fast, stiff, and narrow. So they don't do well in the trees, or the bumps, or frozen crud, or powder deeper than 4 or 5 inches. They are great on gigantic, flat, groomed, empty football field sized runs.

So if you can afford to run multiple set ups for varying locations and conditions, go for it with the race boards. But if you want something a little more versatile, then you'll do well with the Ultra Prime. You hear these guys talk about their "quivers". That's fine if you have the money for that.

And at $160, you can't go wrong. Even if you're luke warm about it (which I highly doubt), it'll be the cheapest brand-new snowboard you'll ever buy.

I recommend buying the board and using it with your soft boot setup at high angles for a few days, or even for the whole season. If you have a high-back binding, you can even try adding a strap around the back to your shin on your lead foot to increase your toe side response. If you like where the feeling is going, then consider boots and bindings.

I rode a race board for a season with soft boots (and 3-strappers) and it solidified my desire to get the hardboots and bindings the next season. So i spread the transition over a couple years, and the board I was on was a bit stiff for the crud, but short enough to be useful in the moguls and trees. but it sank like a rock in powder because it was narrow.

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