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Boarder Cross Training??


DiveBomber
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Trail Running. Actually, it goes for pretty much all sliding-type sports. When you come to a large rock or small ledge, instead of running around it or climbing down it, just jump off- racing style. Pull your legs up and fly the distance, then land and keep going. On snow, just go for a quick romp through the terrain park, hitting some of the smaller features (the ones that you can see the LZ of from above) at speed and doing your best to keep the board on snow.

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I would recommend checking all the ski areas and resorts in your general area (locations you are willing to drive to). Some (but not many) mountains are opening SBX courses for the public. I would look into those mountains hosting USASA SBX events first as they have to build a course for the event and they may just build it early and allow the public to ride it.

If you can find on, then you'll have an opportunity to practice on the real thing.

I would strongly recommend taking it easy on the jumps.

FACT—EVERY TIME I have gone to a public course I've seen people hauled off on stretchers.

Don't forget at the 2006 World Cup SBX event at Lake Placid a Swedish snowboarder Jonatan Johansson, who was good enough to finish 12th in the 2006 Olympics, died while practicing a jump on the course.

In fact at the Dominator Wax clinic held at Springfield, MA on Monday, Dr. Thanos Karydas (owner of Dominator Wax) was talking about it. We were discussing the importance of wearing helmets at the time. He was there when it happened. He said the course was not a bad course. It sounds like a simple miscalculation on the part of the rider. So while you’re in the early stages of learning and even racing, don’t set yourself up for failure by not giving yourself enough time to mature on that sort of terrain.

Also I recall, US Olympic Team SBX racer Jayson Hale crashed during a training run a few days before the event and tore an ACL. This put him out of the competition. Granted the course they set up for the Olympics was far more demanding than any public or USASA course you’re going to ride. But the point is, even very experienced pro racers get hurt or even worse on SBX courses. So have fun, work hard, but remember, but start slow and carefully build your skills.

I’m not sure what anyone else does while practicing, but when I’m practicing on a SBX course, I wear my SBX helmet and back protection. At the events I’ve raced in, it seems all the adult riders had a decent helmet and some back protection. Back protection may cost some extra bucks, but if you’re practicing a jump with some speed, you go airborne, mess up and land on your back, you will be glad you have some protection on.

My 2 cents.

If desired, you can read about the Johansson incident at: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/11796381/

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the best prep I had for SBX was high speed tree runs...

This was years ago but when I decided to do a race with other people on the course at the same time I went into the woods as fast as possible. you have to be confident that you can find the line and know if you screw up it's gonna hurt.

Jumps are jumps - if you're comfortable in the air you're set. Every course is different so know where you're going on the jumps before you hit them...

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different gear for different courses...some courses are better for Plates, some ar better for softies. also remember that USASA (for some reason) sees BX as a freestyle event, and thus has outlawed square tails on boards. not hardboots, but square tails.

ultimately, hardboots will allow you to take a more aggressive line at the gates, but on softies, you can make better use of the terrain, pumping off of banks, and having more forgiving landings to the jumps...

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go jumping, learn how to compress jumps or pop off of them, learn how to keep your body and arms in control while in the air, and learn how to land smoothly. another training method we use a lot is to take your gates and set them up on off piece bumpy runs, or just go makes turns on these types of slopes. boardercross is all about being able to push yourself and keep your board under your feet no matter the terrain or situation.

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go jumping, learn how to compress jumps or pop off of them, learn how to keep your body and arms in control while in the air, and learn how to land smoothly. another training method we use a lot is to take your gates and set them up on off piece bumpy runs, or just go makes turns on these types of slopes. boardercross is all about being able to push yourself and keep your board under your feet no matter the terrain or situation.

Ive been doing pretty decent on jumps, but didnt get into the park much, mostly natural jumps, Havent gone on the biggest jumps, just haven been comfortable with the height yet, last one I did my knee was in my chest on landing

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We in Canada have converted the last (3 or 4) hard booters who have achieved advanced (NorAm) status to "not so soft" gear. I'm strictly a hard boot rider (my son was too), however I've seen the results. These athletes are riding forward forward stance and carving like us... The WC course features are not favouring the hard boot set up. The NorAm circuit (last year) still had some "banked slalom" courses. I believe we will see fewer of those in the future. I don't want to dampen your enthusiasm. Go fast, have fun.

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As far as soft boot vs. hard boot goes...if you can ride soft boots, they are infinitely easier to jump with as they are far more forgiving on rough landings, also jumping in a carving set up is sketchy to say the least unless you are mort. I rode both set ups for years and finally last year I committed to just soft boots but continued to race GS and SL, just on my softies. My turning was way way better than it had been on my hard boots and my results were a lot better too. This is not to say that carving on soft boots is better, but if you get comfortable on one board or type of board you will become a better overall rider which is what sbx is all about

get into the park bro, park jumps are much easier to learn on and are more comparable to boardercross course jumps. if you can safely do so, make runs through the park without stopping, hit a jump, make a couple turns, hit another jump, jump over a rail or something (dont hit it), carve on the side of a jump like a big bank turn, and so on

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Jump, jump and more jumps, in addition to your usual regiment. Being comfortable in the air is essential, even for those not training in SBX, and I feel everyone in hardboots should jump a bit.

Now obviouly not all jumps are created equal. Some throw you more up than out, which is why you need to spot all jumps thouroughly before hitting them at a high rate of speed. Not spotting jumps will get your hurt, it's that simple.

Hitting jumps at speed takes balls. there's no doubt about it. Being thrown up is a totally different feeling than jumping off of something, so definitely spend some time in the park hitting kickers, tables, whatever. Just watch out for the park rats...

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What makes SBX so cool is that it uses so many different snowboard skills. Ride you're set up every where on the mountain, hit the park often no matter what the conditions are. Ride as many different terrain features and conditions as you can. That's the best SBX training you can do. Training on SBX courses resorts build for the public is usually lame. They are dumbed down and you only get good at that course (not really good training at all).

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I do agree with Phil on the point that riding the same public course over and over again in the end will get you good at that course only, of course the same can be said for riding on the same WC course, tree lines, or park jumps repeatedly. Variety is a good thing.

I can't speak for Utah or Colorado, but in the East places like Bromley, Killington Bear Mountain, and Okemo have public courses, two of which some of the USASA series use for their SBX events.

Granted, they are not at a USASA Nationals course level, but new racers can make some strides in that direction. Personally speaking, having the ability to come out of a gate, ride some banked turns, hit some jumps and the like, even on a lesser course helped me transition from nothing to a little bit of something, and in turn helped me prepare to race on a Nationals course.

Clearly USASA (series) or public type courses will only act as a primer for someone new to the sport. And as is the case with any skill sport variety is important. So Phil makes a good point.

If you're skilled enough to race through the forests, and lands big jumps in the terrain parks, then cutting your teeth on a USASA (series) or public type course probably won't do much good for you. If you're someone like me who had zero background in such things, overcoming the small stuff gave me the confidence to try bigger and more difficult stuff.

When I was younger, as an athlete I attended camps where I received training from Olympic and World Champions. In every instance they encouraged me to start small and work up. Later when I began training others, I followed their pattern of start small, establish confidence, and build from there.

Perhaps encouraging you to start small and work your way up was the wrong advice for someone just getting started in SBX.

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We in Canada have converted the last (3 or 4) hard booters who have achieved advanced (NorAm) status to "not so soft" gear. I'm strictly a hard boot rider (my son was too), however I've seen the results. These athletes are riding forward forward stance and carving like us... The WC course features are not favouring the hard boot set up. The NorAm circuit (last year) still had some "banked slalom" courses. I believe we will see fewer of those in the future. I don't want to dampen your enthusiasm. Go fast, have fun.

Thanks for the advice all..

I I do have some stiff softboot set ups, Would a 3rd strap binding be a good idea?

Im looking for the right board right now. I would prefer to do it in hard boots, But I can see how/why soft could work in some respects.

Though during the olympics several including the silver medalist were on hard.

That also makes me wonder, IF I do it in hard boots what kind/length of board?

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just thought id show this :

<object width="425" height="355"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mcfhr_EFBF8&rel=1"></param><param name="wmode" value="transparent"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mcfhr_EFBF8&rel=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" wmode="transparent" width="425" height="355"></embed></object>

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looks like a horrible course, and some prettty poor riding for such a flat, featureless course. he is skidding turns, and show little flexibility in the knees. The helmet cam shots are useless, except that is appears he is looking a the tip of the board, not down the course.

in response to the initial question, It is also imperitaive that you learn to look down the course. racersa are genterally looking two gates ahead of themselves...

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