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Getting up the hill - traction question


Buell
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One of the mountains we will ride this winter has a very difficult road to get up when it snows. It is the only road my 2WD Tacoma with snow tires has had any difficulty (I had to put on chains) during snow season. On a powder day it is all 4WD vehicles with good tires except for us, with chains, and another guy in the same truck with no chains (should have asked him).

For this year we are keeping the Tacoma so I am looking for thoughts on how to improve my traction and climbing. The road is not safe for adding chains if I need them once I start up it.

I am considering combinations of several options:

Adding more sandbags to the back (I already run up to 400 pounds).

Adding a set of studded tires on the rear drive wheels (ice is not an issue).

Getting a pair of "the best studless" snow tires. I currently use a brand that no one ever mentions

Any other thoughts would be greatly appreciated.

Buell

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I'm shocked you guys dont have a 4x4! :eek: Sell half your boards and you could probably afford a new 4x4 Tacoma :lol:. small rear wheel drive trucks kinda suck for fresh snow, chains may be your best choice. If you go with studs, get them narrow as they will have an easier time digging down to something firm/packed. I'd hesitate to put more then 600 lbs in the back as it will make the front end a little light and hard to steer.

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Galen, I could get one, but since I would only need it a few times a year, it doesn't seem worth it. We drive this truck 20,000 miles a year and I like the gas savings. It works fine in the snow, except going up this one road, which is about 4 miles long, when there is snow on it.

I will sell you my Pogo 180 Longboard (that would get me part way there ;)), but since you don't weigh more than me, it is probably not for you either.

Interesting thought about the weight and the front end.

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I'm just guessing on the front end thing. when I get over 1000 lbs in the bed of my smaller tacoma, it feels a little swimmy, and I'm guessing that would be compunded in snow and ice. If you can get all the weight in front of the wheel wells, probably wont matter as much.

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If it's just snow, not ice, A good winter specific tire. Blizzak etc... Also WIDE "grooves" between the tread blocks will throw the snow out. Also "Siping" the tires helps on hard packed snow/ice. Studs don't help on fresh snow, only on ice or hardpack.

Don

Feed the addiction...

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I run Nokian Hakkapeliittas on my Nissan rear wheel drive pick-up with aprox. 150 lbs. in the bed. Works great most any time and anywhere in snow. Go as thin as you can get away with on your vehicle/wheels. If you're having trouble getting a straight answer on what size is appropriate, call Pete at the Tire Source in Boulder CO. The guy is a saint, tell him what you need and he'll get you the right tire.

http://www.tunnellracing.com/TireSource/index.html

http://www.nokiantyres.com/passengercars_product_en?product=10341085&name=HAKKAPELIITTA+5%20Nokian

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