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Looking for an all-mountain board


John Bell
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Hi, everybody. I just registered and am looking to get started in alpine carving. I really, really want to keep my soft (but stiff) boots and use conventional bindings, both for comfort and economy reasons. (RJ at Exotic Boards told me the Europeans do this.)

To be honest, I'm not really sure what I should be looking for in a board. But Carver's Almanac says an all-mountain board is best to start on, so I figure I should probably take that advice. I'm never going to race; I just want to lay down some curves--and yet not sink in the powder.

I've been riding for 10 years and am fairly advanced; I've done the double-blacks off the ridge at Loveland with no problem, as well as Superstar at Killington. I weigh 170 and wear size 10 boots. Needless to say, no park or pipe ever.

If anyone has a new board they're selling, please e-mail me. Or even if you just have general thoughts or advice, I'm all ears.

I'm in NYC but also make trips to DC quite often--so if I could buy a board from someone on the East Coast, that would be ideal.

Thanks!

--John

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Welcome to BOL.

As BlueB said, on softies you will need to ride wider boards than most of the AM alpine decks. A lot of people mention the Prior ATV as a great hardboot / softboot board. A BX board might also be great for you.

While adding a pair of hardboots and bindings will certainly add cost, my hardboots are wonderfully comfortable. Unless you walk around on hard surfaces a lot, comfort is not an issue.

You can probably do a search for "soft boot boards", or something like that and find some previously posted info. Likewise, you could also post in the main forum looking for opinions. I expect you will find some helpful people there that might overlook this in the WTB section.

Good luck, Buell

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Why bother with an alpine all mountain board if you are riding soft boots? You will be spending more money for nothing. The prior atv is selling for 800.00 this year. There are lots of directional free riding boards for soft boots that will carve superbly and are way less money. Ride makes some good decks and Never Summer and there are other companies as well. You could ride a longer board to get more effective edge and have better float in powder. I ride hard boots mainly because my feet hurt too much in a soft boot set up but you can carve well with soft boots and it is cheaper for the gear. I wish alpine gear was cheaper but it costs more to make it and less of it is being sold so the price is higher. It is amazing how much soft gear is avaialble and for cheap prices.

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I have a Burton Alp171 which would be perfect for you. It has been sitting in my closet doing nothing and has only been ridden 5 times (It really is like new). The Alp will take you from beginer carving to intermediate level with ease. $150 plus ship. I plan to put it on ebay just b4 xmas. Even if you don't take it, good luck with this new element of the sport. You will be happy you tried it.

email: skopp2000@hotmail.com if you are interested.

burton alp 171.bmp

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Sounds like I have some more research to do.

Someone asked why I'd stay with the soft boots. Part of it is that I just bought some last season and don't want to basically throw away the money I spent on them, and part of it is that I don't relish the idea of clunking through a parking lot full of cars while wearing hard boots, en route to the lift. And the softies are unbelievably comfortable.

I appreciate all the help and look forward to getting into the sport once I have some approximation of an alpine setup.

--John

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Sounds like I have some more research to do.

Someone asked why I'd stay with the soft boots. Part of it is that I just bought some last season and don't want to basically throw away the money I spent on them, and part of it is that I don't relish the idea of clunking through a parking lot full of cars while wearing hard boots, en route to the lift. And the softies are unbelievably comfortable.

I appreciate all the help and look forward to getting into the sport once I have some approximation of an alpine setup.

--John

Comfortable? I guess you dont ride much, I have some of the stiffest soft boots made and my legs feet are still sore after half a day, but I can ride in HB all day.

That 5 min walk to the lift, is your reason? Thats weak man :sleep:

Buy some slip on mocks that you can put in a pack easy, or hand to the storage guys for a buck.

I like walking through the lot and getting the WTF?? Look :eplus2:

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This board will be good for your weight and foot size because it is one of the wider carving boards made. Plus it is a bit softer than most so it will be easier for you to control. I suppose you could wear soft boots; but you are wrong about them being more comfortable than hard ones. Even with a cheap used pair, you will see what I mean. If you insist on softies, just angle your feet forward so your toes don't drag; or get some lifter plates. But you are missing out on the whole point. Let me know what you want to do. Thanks.

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what exactly is the width on those alps? Thin they would work as a BX board with risers?( I mean with soft boots depending on the course)

I've never ridden boardercross, but I own two Alps - a 163 and a 164 - and I hope eventually to own a 171. I think they'd make lousy BX boards. Though relatively soft and wide for a carver, they have a longer "pure carve" effective edge.

The tail, though not absolutely squared off, is close.

I think they'd be an open invitation to catching an edge on a banked BX course.

Would make spectacular video bloopers, though.

good luck

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check out an F2 speedcross they carve well in softies .

the soft carve GURU as far as new equipment design is here http://web.mac.com/surfrodz/Site/SZ_snow.html

wayne has some killer ideas.

otherwise pick a softer flex alpine board and any of them will work. the naysayers just haven't tried it with the right amount of enthusiasm:eplus2:

I ride an 18cm waisted board at 60 degrees plus in softies no problems.

check out the pics on the above links and see how severe the angles are.

It becomes a little bit more like waterskiing or skwalling.

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I first got into carving and RACING on a 164 asym alp with soft boots. It was a STIFF set up for softies, (Burton comp boots and torque bindings), but I could run almost 45 degrees and still have it work. I don't know what your gear is, but my hardboots are much more comfortable than my softies were because there is no pressure point from the straps. My comps were comfortable till I killed the binding straps to get all the control I could. The hard boots, yes, they are clumsy to walk around in, but when you strap in, the comfort does not change.

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