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quad burnout


nigelc
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So when I ride with my mates who are mostly skiers I seem to use up my quads at a rate at least ten times theirs. I am riding race boards on chopped up groomers but surely there must be a better way. the amount of knee bend seems to be the issue - how long can everybody else hold a deep crouch against the g force?

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Again take what everyone is saying with a grain of salt. What works for one person may not for for you.

My grain of salt is this: everyone's different. It could be a setup issue, it could be a lack of strength. Play around with your stance, especially width, and find what works best for you.

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IMHO its a stance related issue. I often throw on the softies when my quads get to burnt to ride safely. Its like putting on a new set of legs. Different muscles with different stances. I imagine it would work if you changed your hard setup angles during the day as well.:lurk:

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It's just a combination of all: training the legs, stance, ridingstyle, sort of board you ride, snowconditions. I mostly train my legs during the whole year now I am getting older and I don't recover that fast anymore. I must say that's profitable for my endurance :biggthump

By the way, I can hold my legs longer on my Tinkler 202 than on my SWOARD 168. The Tinkler goes through everything due to its weight and length and of course craftmanship (Titanal) if there are none obstacles :cool::eplus2:

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On a related note:

What has everyone been doing to keep in shape for the winter season?

I have somewhat burly-ish quads but I still get pretty burnt out by the end of the day. I've been doing a lot of cycling this summer, but I don't think that will provide the same kind of work that riding demands. After not riding for a few years, getting back into it last year was definitely a surprise insofar as my legs being able to keep up with the workload.

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For the past several years I've alternated between off season training and doing nothing. The first few days on my alpine board each year yields a case of quad burn regardless. My contention is that there is no exercise that truly replicates the portion of the quads that gets the most work.

I do distance riding on unicycles in the off season and my quads get a real workout but I know when winter arrives and I hit snow I'm going to suffer.

After a few weeks of riding I'm usually okay.

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FWIW - aggressive alpine riding is tough, really tough. There is no amount of exercise or conditioning that will get your legs to the point that you won't feel the burn....if you're truly ripping down the hill.

It's all relative as everyone is boxed within their own ability. If you're in top condition and riding like a world champ, it's still burns. The only way to make it burn less is to ease up on the aggressiveness meter!

As Greg Lemond says....it doesn't get any easier, but you'll get faster.

K

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I am riding either an oxygen proton 170 or a hot blast 167. These days I am using 60/53 fr/ba on my sb413's with the single position lean adjusters. One of the reasons I am starting to prefer the hot blast is that it is a little wider than the proton so I can knock my angles back by three degrees or so which seems a little easier. I am not totally out of shape and do a little cycling and running all year - about 100-200km/week on the bike and 30km/week of running. It does not seem to matter how fit I am, nothing can prepare my legs for snowboarding. I don't remember having such issues on my softies way back - of course I was younger then too! I am wondering if it is stance or technique related. Am I putting too much weight on my back leg? - this always seems to suffer the most. Is this caused by rotating too much to face through and past the nose when riding heelside? It seems to me that when I ride with less knee bend then my ability to absorb bumps etc is impaired and the likelihood of a wipe out is much increased, so riding with straighter legs can't be the answer can it? My skier friends seem to ski with very bent knees and do not get burnt out like me. perhaps I am simply riding with too much weight back?

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