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What cant/lift do you use?


Jack M
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What cant/lift do you use  

220 members have voted

  1. 1. What cant/lift do you use

    • front foot: toe lift only
      33
    • front foot: toe lift with inward cant
      32
    • front foot: toe lift with outward cant
      7
    • front foot: totally flat
      37
    • rear foot: heel lift only
      33
    • rear foot: heel lift with inward cant
      50
    • rear foot: heel lift with outward cant
      13
    • rear foot: totally flat
      17


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I use the burton seven degree cant wedge on the front and back foot, both inward. I don't really ride with my knees together all the time as this setup might suggest (heelside maybe). I just feel like it puts me in a comfortable riding position and helps me to get my body parts to be where they need/want to be for a stable high speed carve and easy transitions.

Just an FYI: To the best of my measuring ability, if you use TD2 cants... they would be set at 70 degrees for the cant angle to be the same as the Burtons.

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Front foot: toe lift with about 1 degree of outward cant

Rear foot: heel lift only

Front and rear about the same lift. Depending on which board I ride.

I use a wider or narrower stance with either more or less lift (longer boards, wider stance, little more lift)… lift varies between 2 to 5 degree…

Jack, hope you come to the SES again!

ray

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Just an FYI: To the best of my measuring ability, if you use TD2 cants... they would be set at 70 degrees for the cant angle to be the same as the Burtons.

Nope. Burton cants slope purely along the long axis of the board - same as the TD1 cant/lift discs. So on TD2's, that's your cant disc set at 90 degrees.

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Nope. Burton cants slope purely along the long axis of the board - same as the TD1 cant/lift discs. So on TD2's, that's your cant disc set at 90 degrees.

You could be right Jack... but I fiddled with this for hours when I had my TD2s and 70 is what I came up with. I rode them from 90 down to 70 too and thought it felt right at 70. Just wondering how you're sure. It seems to me there is more heel lift (for back foot) than cant which would make it something different than 90. Or am I in left field here?

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I let the board tell me what to do, hence a love affair with Cateks.

Generally more heal lift on the rear then toe lift on the front, and generally no cant. Freeride/ pow I usually run flat, race boards usually lift as above. On the 200 AM I use a little bit of inward cant on the front and a bit more toe lift then usual. Stance runs between 19.5" and 21.5" with a 32" inseam, seemingly with little bearing on cant or lift and more on "sweet spot" and insert pattern. I have pretty straight legs, and my feet point pretty close to straight ahead in a neutral flat footed stance.

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You could be right Jack... but I fiddled with this for hours when I had my TD2s and 70 is what I came up with. I rode them from 90 down to 70 too and thought it felt right at 70. Just wondering how you're sure. It seems to me there is more heel lift (for back foot) than cant which would make it something different than 90. Or am I in left field here?

I dunno, but when I used Burton bindings (shudder) I remember eyeballing those cants to see what the dealio was. I mounted the cant on the board and then held the tail of the board up to my face and sighted down its length. Looked like the cant was sloping only along the long axis of the board to me. Never got out the protractor though!

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With the Cateks I got last year, I finally managed to be comfortable with front toe lift and read heel lift, no cant. When I got my first alpine board and Burton bindings, I installed them like the manual said, Burton 7° cant under the rear foot. I rode like that for a couple of years until I started to read here. My front leg was always buring after a while. I got a second cant and tried 2 cants, it was not so bad, but then I mounted the bindings flat and it was much better. I don't like the cant because it drives the knees together:eek:, creates leg fatigue and gives less control. A thing that I found with proper toe/heel lift is that you can have a wider stance (more power) and still be more comfortable.

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Jack, thanks. I've read that a few times. I guess what I'm looking for is something that probably hasn't been written, or can't be due to the vagaries of individual preference. As in.... Making this adjustment causes this to happen. Or.... If you have this problem, try this adjustment.

Something much more specific than that article. I've got a basic handle on the whole lift/cant thing, but not enough experience or playing with it to understand what changes cause what to happen or how to diagnose particular issues.

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Jack, thanks. I've read that a few times. I guess what I'm looking for is something that probably hasn't been written, or can't be due to the vagaries of individual preference. As in.... Making this adjustment causes this to happen. Or.... If you have this problem, try this adjustment.

Something much more specific than that article. I've got a basic handle on the whole lift/cant thing, but not enough experience or playing with it to understand what changes cause what to happen or how to diagnose particular issues.

It's all about feel at this point... each rider will have a different opinion once the basic concept is understood.... May the force be with you.

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I run 3*lift no cant on the front (57*) and 5* lift 1* of inward cant in the back (54*) on my RC using OS1's ...my Slalom board has SnowPros which I have adjusted at their most radical in lift and as little cant as posible which I'm guessing to be about 1* of lift front and rear and I got the front flat but the rear has about 1* (same angles as RC). I haven't riding it but my stance is narrower on it than my RC so hopefully it's work well. The SL board is mostly planned for local hills and night boarding.

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rear foot - Burton disc cant on '96 Burton race bindings.

I'm not sure what the angle is. The disc says "4" and I'd say its maybe 10 deg rotated off from canting right up the centerline of the board. So mostly inward, and a little forward, but not much.

Without taking the binding off and looking at the numbers on the cant plate that's all I've got.

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This is interesting reading. I was out last Sunday and had trouble releasing from a healside turn. I detuned that part of the edge a bit, but now I'm wondering if there is an adjustment to the lift/cant that would help. Ugh. This stuff gives me a headache.

I too gave myself headaches for the first several years of riding messing around with cant/lift. Then I learned that many riders whose style I have a lot of admiration for (e.g., Jacques Rilliet, Patrice Fivat, Rob Crobar, Peter Vu) all ride flat. So I threw my cant/lifts in the trash. I've enjoyed the simplicity of not having to deal with that anymore and IMHO there are many more important variables than cant/lift and unless you have an unusual anatomical situation they aren't necessary or beneficial. Judging from the poll results, not an opinion held by the majority apparently. :)

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I ride a few degrees of toe lift and a few degrees outward cant, with a lot of lift on the back foot and a few degrees outward cant. I'm slightly bowlegged, so the outward cant is of utmost importance.

I'm surprised at how many people ride with inward cant on the back foot. It just seems counter-intuitive to me for pressuring those heelside turns (physiological problems aside).

You're bowlegged! That explains the outward cant. I tried that stationary on carpet and the outward cant HURT my knee. Too much torgue on it. Frankly, I'm afraid to try it on the mountain for fear of more pain and long recovery.

I too gave myself headaches for the first several years of riding messing around with cant/lift. Then I learned that many riders whose style I have a lot of admiration for (e.g., Jacques Rilliet, Patrice Fivat, Rob Crobar, Peter Vu) all ride flat. So I threw my cant/lifts in the trash. I've enjoyed the simplicity of not having to deal with that anymore and IMHO there are many more important variables than cant/lift and unless you have an unusual anatomical situation they aren't necessary or beneficial. Judging from the poll results, not an opinion held by the majority apparently. :)

I suffer from a series of joint problems caused by past injuries. Riding flat isn't an option. I need some lift and cant for my knees and hips. Getting it dialed in is going be take a while.

I've backed it off to mostly lift and a little inward cant. We'll see how it goes on Saturday. I went out last Sunday and felt like a newbie again. I really sucked! That's what I get for almost 9 years away from it. Hopefully it'll come back soon. Kirkwood is calling for an easy slope open on Saturday. I'm going to go back to basic drills and work on the Norm and Norm 2. That should get me back to carving.

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Jack, thanks. I've read that a few times. I guess what I'm looking for is something that probably hasn't been written, or can't be due to the vagaries of individual preference. As in.... Making this adjustment causes this to happen. Or.... If you have this problem, try this adjustment.

Something much more specific than that article. I've got a basic handle on the whole lift/cant thing, but not enough experience or playing with it to understand what changes cause what to happen or how to diagnose particular issues.

I hear you loud and clear, and I wish I could write that article. I think you could probably count on one hand how many people in the world are qualified to write it. I know one. One would have to have set up about 100 people's bindings, spending at least half a day with each person. By the way, it doesn't take much outward cant to make a difference, like half a degree.

JIM - I too am surprised - nay, shocked.

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Then I learned that many riders whose style I have a lot of admiration for (e.g., Jacques Rilliet, Patrice Fivat, Rob Crobar, Peter Vu) all ride flat. So I threw my cant/lifts in the trash.

Do you also ride with your bindings so loose that the warranty is voided like those guys? (yes, it is)

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I ride a few degrees of toe lift and a few degrees outward cant, with a lot of lift on the back foot and a few degrees outward cant. I'm slightly bowlegged, so the outward cant is of utmost importance.

I'm surprised at how many people ride with inward cant on the back foot. It just seems counter-intuitive to me for pressuring those heelside turns (physiological problems aside).

I'm confused... wouldn't outward cant on your back foot incline your right knee (assuming you have a regular not goofy stance) toward the tail of the board... thus making you more bowlegged?

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