Jump to content

Do you grease the threads on your TD2 bolts?


johnstewart
 Share

Recommended Posts

Trying to find the answer to the best way to mount my TD2 hardware.

Flamey original thread here:

http://www.bomberonline.com/VBulletin/showthread.php?t=12869

I am perhaps just tightening too much; when I release them it does seem like the metal is binding/seizing.

Does anyone grease their threads? Do you just use them dry (and perhaps not crank as hard as I am)?

I'm not enamoured with using loctite because I fiddle with them too much.

johnS

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest thomas_m

When mine bind, it's not the threads, it's the heads, especially on the intec heel receivers. I use a bit of Pedro's on the underside of the head and it's become a non-issue.

T.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One of the things I've noticed with all bindings is when you mount them a room temp, they can seem a little loose after riding a bit. Conversly, when I fiddle with them on the hill, they are quite tight when I fiddle with them again at room temp. I'll be using some B-Butter on the heads this year to see if I can get rid of that initial creaking sound when loosening the bolts.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The tapered part of the bolt head, mounting the top plate to the base plate. If I remember correctly, the anodizing on the top and the stainless bolt try to sieze together, when you loosen watch them carefully, you may actually see a spark from loosening it! DO NOT do that to the threads themselves.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

suggests that, I sprayed down my TD1 screws with this PTFE grease that goes on thin but thickens after a couple of people said to try it

it certainly did not make things worse and I do not remember losing bolts after that

that season I had a few come loose and rattle out prior to greasing them

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm like Steve. I smell a scent that's like gunpowder when I loosen the bolts on the top plate.

I'm thinking that a bit of bomber butter on those "ramps" (if that's the word) would be good.

I Bomber Butter the top plate->cant/disk bolt heads and it generally prevents the gunpowder smell. I've never greased the center disk -> board bolts since I've never had problems with them loosening or being tough to back out. I use a T-wrench but tighten with my left hand (I'm right handed) and that seems to get me the desired torque.

On non-greased top plate -> cant disk bolts, I've literally seen sparks when loosening them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So you mean the head of the bolt is seizing against the TD2 plate, and it's not the threads? Interesting; I hadn't considered that.

thanks

Yes, and furthermore, the head of the bolt gives you a false torque. Some people grease just the heads and some grease the whole enchilada. They have their reasons, but I just can't bring myself to grease the threads. It may be the right thing to do, but it makes about as much sense to me as the fact that hot water can freeze faster than cold water. It's true, but I still don't believe it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow, Jack! I never thought I'd see a reference to the Mpemba effect (pronounced oom-pem'-buh for those curious) that states in certain conditions, hot water can freeze faster than cooler water.:biggthump

http://www.math.ucr.edu/home/baez/physics/General/hot_water.html

I've started putting bomber butter on the head (not threads) and it seems to help tremendously. I can't really see any reason NOT to put it on the threads (considering how threads work, this shouldn't be an issue), but I just never have because the bit 'o butter around the head seemed to cure the false-torquing drag felt by the head rubbing against the plate.

Still, check all your bolts each morning. I've only had a bolt come loose once. It was on my way down the mountain (luckily just loose and not completely off) and it scared the crap out of me considering what a wreck that could've become. That was the only warning I needed and now check all the bolts each morning rather than 'whenever I get around to it'.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm with Jack, intuitively it seems strange to lube threads because you'd think the threads would slip. But thread friction prevents this. If you don't lose preload, you don't lose friction, and the bolt doesn't loosen. I always use the T-wrench.

I read somewhere that most people tighten small bolts/nuts too much and large ones not enough. I don't know if it applies here but I thought it was interesting.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

35 inch pounds if you grease the taper only, and up to 45 inch pounds for a non lubricated poor alignment dirty thread without lube. That's what I come up with after fooling with the bolts and my torque wrench, evaluating the typical installation with a T wrench. Of course the applied torque works out to be the same, lower torque with less resistance equals the same applied torque. Your mileage may vary. Remember 3 threads minimum engagement, and that is REALLY minimum on the edge of dangerous. And this only applies to taper head stainless Allen bolts fastening the binding plate to the board.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

35 inch pounds if you grease the taper only, and up to 45 inch pounds for a non lubricated poor alignment dirty thread without lube. That's what I come up with after fooling with the bolts and my torque wrench, evaluating the typical installation with a T wrench. Of course the applied torque works out to be the same, lower torque with less resistance equals the same applied torque. Your mileage may vary. Remember 3 threads minimum engagement, and that is REALLY minimum on the edge of dangerous. And this only applies to taper head stainless Allen bolts fastening the binding plate to the board.

Awesome; thanks!

You're so getting sued, dude. =)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Applying grease to any bolted joint reduces the friction between the mating threads of the bolt and nut thus increasing the tension in the bolt causing it stretch more than when the same torque was applied to a dry joint. If you are not careful you will cause the bolt to fail or strip out the nut. Good advice to reduce your torque if you lube your threads.<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /><o:p></o:p>

The only way to really know if your applied torque is correct is through testing. Torque charts are for reference so unless you have thirty bolts and t-nuts and torque them to failure, record the torque and plug the information into a formula to get the correct torque or have access to a device that measures clamp load and bolt tension you just guessing based on personal experience of your past failures of over tightening or under tightening a joint. <o:p></o:p>

<o:p></o:p>

Grease, oil, lock-tite or other petroleum distillates can eat into plastic, caution. Lock-tite is a documented no, no. Grease, oil or bomber butter?<o:p></o:p>

<o:p></o:p>

The smoke you see or smell is corrosion between the stainless steel bolts to the aluminum cant disk. The corrosion bond is broken when you loosen the joint. When your board gets wets the water acts as a conductor to allow current to flow, causing corrosion between two dissimilar metals.<o:p></o:p>

<o:p> </o:p>

Personally I do not apply grease or oil. I check my bindings every day, before I ride, and during breaks. At the end of the day I loosen the bolts and let the assembly dry in the hotel room and then reassemble in the morning or late evening when the joint is dry. I use a “T” handle to tighten the joint, until the desired twist in the “T” wrench is obtained, a torque wrench would be better but I don’t have one. <o:p></o:p>

<o:p> </o:p>

If you want to really piss off your buddy, the next time you help him rotate his tires, grease his rusty hub bolts and hub nuts, crank up the air pressure, set the impact wrench to max and see how long it takes before he necks off the hub bolt. What is ironic is that most joints require some lubrication to ensure the bolted joint is consistently tightened to the correct tension and corresponding torque.

Always research what your read on-line as most posting are full of .......<o:p></o:p>

Link to comment
Share on other sites

god I love it when people don't post condescending responses. Especially ones edited in office that end up with smileys all over.

I'll say this again:

dead certain that fin recommends greasing the threads. Or, as dead certain as my addled brain can be.

come on, Fin...where are you?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest kennyusmc

Good 'ole synthetic grease does fine in protecting the bolts and threads. I don't think Fin and his design partner took on the creation and liabilty of the bindings without a little industrial engineering. Now if we have a mechanical engineer , or a master machinest i would love their input.

I like anti-seize:

Like an example would be placing some anti-seize on the bolts that go into a Tittanium combustion dome of an M1a1 Tank turbine ( gets just a few degres hot ) and that might prevent some siezing of bolts.

Corrosion bond

that is a nice term , did you invent it ? Try electrolysis

From a few people who make anit seize.

Look below this is why anit seize is ofte used used:?

Anti-Seize provides protection from electrolysis, which can cause seizing of the thread and stripping when dissimilar elements, such as steel bolts in aluminum blocks or steel spark plugs in aluminum heads, are in contact with each other.

Another thing anti seize does "Anti-Seize is ideal for all threaded connections that are subject to heat, corrosion, or repeated assembly and disassembly..." since you take yours apart daily you might want to reconsider that bolt stretching theory.

Another choice might be molybdenum disulfide which is used on a few rapid moving parts like the rotary on a Light Armored Vehicle 25mm Bushmaster Cannon ...watchout this stuff stains.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think there is anything bad about using lube or anti-sieze in fasteners as long as the reduced friction (especially with anti-sieze) is compensated for by using less torque.

Actually the more I think about it the better lubing everything (heads and thread) sounds, because it'll reduce the wear on the hex sockets and tools and make it easier to get the preload needed to keep the parts from sliding in shear. After thinking about it this morning, I am starting to believe 100% that the bolt loosening in bindings has nothing to do with thread friction, but is caused by shearing loads causing the plates to slip, making the thread mating surfaces and bolt heads move, causing an off-torque. If the bolt tension/preload (not torque) is sufficient, this shouldn't happen (the plates shouldn't move with respect to each other). If the plates don't slide with respect to each other, I don't think there is any way the bolts can loosen because with enough preload on the bolt, it doesn't see any changing tensile force when the board is ridden. It should no more loosen on the mountain than it would sitting in the living room.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share



  • Recently Browsing

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...