Jump to content

teach

Member
  • Content Count

    951
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    2

teach last won the day on November 19 2016

teach had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

49 Excellent

1 Follower

About teach

  • Rank
    Learner

Details

  • Location
    Philly
  • Home Mountain/Resort?
    Camelback
  • Occupation?
    I teach
  • Current Boards in your Quiver
    Oxygen Proton 178, Coiler AM VSR 170, Burton FP 173/167, SG 185, Coiler NSR 183, Ogasaka RC-Z 185, Scott Strike 185
    Soft-boot: F2 Respect 176
  • Current Boots Used?
    UPZ RC-10 green (!) w/Flo liners
    Soft: Northwave Decade
  • Current bindings and set-up?
    TD3, SW and regular, 62/60, 3/6 degree front, 6 degree rear.
    Catek OS1, similar setup
    Slight outward cant on front and rear, still trying to dial it in.

    Soft: Burton C60.
  • Snowboarding since
    1979
  • Hardbooting since
    2010

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. As long as there aren't chunks missing I'm fine. The yellow pair are lightly used. Photo:
  2. I'd like a pair of red TD3 erings. I have a set of yellow erings I don't use. I'd trade ideally.
  3. You left a lot on the table there, not playing with outward cant on front or less extreme outward cant on the rear with the highly adjustable td2s. Did you do anything with foot support in the boots? Sounds like you're getting somewhere in any case.
  4. Yes, I have them. Decent shape. I'll get photos tomorrow and PM you
  5. No, I have the same concern. I really like the gloves I'm using now (leather) and the index finger gets abraded by the toe lever. I use duct tape on the lever, or a pull tab made from a broken bomber leash. The latter is great as I have some hip pain from smashing it a while back. The extra inch or two it saves me is gold. I'm going to get some dyneema or similar cord to make a few of these pull tabs to keep in my bag. I like the dip idea and may do that too! And sno seal on gloves for preservation. All fine ideas!
  6. My daughter and I rode Siberia Bowl years ago, when she was about 10. It's seriously steep and absolutely wide open. No trail merges, just a huge bowl. I really can't think of an excuse for the 13 year old. Including "just being 13" . The closest I can come is that it's a parent and/or coach's responsibility to verify that the kid has the necessary common sense to not endanger others (or themselves). You wouldn't give your kid a gun and let him/her loose, right? Or a car? A year or two after that my daughter's school took kids skiing after school. The chaperones just let the kids loose, some with no previous experience skiing or snowboarding, with the whole gamut of extra-careful and conscientious to devil-may-care attitudes. A friend of my daughter was the latter type, headed for the attractive piles of freshly-made snow and hit some buried "hazards" (snowmaking water lines, probably) resulting in serious spine injury and paralysis. A fully preventable tragedy -- had any one of the responsible parties done their job, it wouldn't have happened. I think in order to sell as many people as possible on skiing, the risks are painted as just random risks, like air travel, rather than things people have a good degree of control over, like driving. Really unfortunate. I feel really bad for this 10 year old. I'm sure the 13 year old is mortified and now belatedly appreciates the responsibility he has when out on the mountain. The coach and parents? Maybe there's hope. Patrollers? Doesn't seem like there's hope.
  7. In addition to the duct tape build-up under the ball of the foot i use a fair amount of outward canting on both bindings. I expect that getting the foot support right will reduce the need for outward canting, but have not reached that point yet. The airspace-under-the-ball-of-the foot syndrome causes the flattened out foot to measure a lot longer than when it's properly supported. In my case, it's at least a centimeter difference. Get some playing cards and stack them under the ball of your bare foot until standing one-footed relaxed is possible (no twitchiness). Then measure.
  8. Forgive me for staying the obvious, but if your boots are indeed too big, most of the suggestions you'll get won't have a chance to be helpful, especially if they've accurately spotted another issue. Your foot's center is likely well back from your boot's center, so offsetting the bindings toeside may just be centering your feet. That's quite a hack, and getting boots that fit well would be a much better fix, if only to reduce misleading spurious issues. (The Beckmann procedure starts with getting your boots set up). Assuming that extra boot is at most a contributor to your issue, but not the major one, I'll suggest a potential cause of your autorotation. This plagues me in many ways, and I have still not 100% dealt with it properly. Beckmann pointed this connection out to me at ECES several years ago. Standing flat, while you're supposed to have "three points of support" on each foot, I only have two: heel and metatarsal for little toe. That is, I'm on the outsides of my feet. Letting the ball of my foot reach the ground puts my joints in an uncomfortable, grinding, unstable configuration (and causes knee issues for me). So riding one-footed off the lift is sketchy and either I'm stuck on heelside (and autorotate, though I've learned to control it a bit with back foot placement and maybe some contortions as others have suggested), or I'm fully committed to toeside. There's no middle ground, as having a balanced posture either requires "two-point" support (heelside leverage) or three-point support and compensating postural contortions that put me over the toeside edge (toeside pressure and leverage). There's a huge "dead zone" in between these extremes (air space under the ball of the foot). So transitioning from one to the other is nearly impossible, and will usually result in a caught edge. Maybe you have a similar situation? When I see riders with large difference in front and rear angles, I suspect this. Rotating the feet outwards allows the ball of the foot to reach the ground with less inward torque on the knees. Instead a little forward flexing does the job. But it's no help riding one-footed.I Hope that's at least slightly useful. The fix is to have support under the ball of the foot to allow "three point support" with a balanced, aligned posture . Beckmann suggested a particular kind of thick duct tape on the bottom of the footbed, layered under the area, adding layers until it feels stable (no twitchiness). I have not gotten this right yet. Way better than without, for sure.
  9. Still available? PM sent
  10. I might have what you're looking for. I'll dig it up this weekend and take some photos of it if you're still looking.
  11. Your heel will settle into the liner after a few days out, and the toe box (neoprene, I guess) will stop feeling like it's curling your toes. Even with a "too small" liner. I have the next shell up and one pair of 9.5 liners (largest for the shell) and a pair of 9. They both work well now, but at first were way too short. (Actually, it takes a few minutes after putting then on before your foot settles in, and they seem tight before that. I just wear them more or less unbuckled until I get on the snow. No problems then, good all day.) -You have the largest liners for your shell. Doesn't mean an 8.5 wouldn't work though, I suppose. -The toe is meant to give, a lot. That's why it's a different material. -Intuition pro tongue liners are thinner, with a similar toe box and sole, and would work if you're otherwise not having success. These actually leave too much space for me but seem like they'd be very good.
  12. I think I have two. Do you have any 6 degree to trade?
  13. PHK seem have two basic designs. The first is the 46.6/Highlander. They come with a bunch of angled plastic shims for under toe/heel blocks. The binding baseplate is slightly off the board, so the screw lengths don't have to be spot on. PHK also makes a binding with what looks like a Catek-like design, the H1. On their webpage (under parts) they have what looks like a unicant-type under-binding plate.
  14. The Virus bindings look like they might be made by Phiokka. I'd add Phiokka to your list.
  15. Best closing day at Camelback I've been to! Frozen granular gradually turning to thin coat of loose granular on ice. One of the better days of the season, actually.
×
×
  • Create New...