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teach

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teach last won the day on November 19 2016

teach had the most liked content!

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About teach

  • Rank
    Learner

Details

  • Location
    Philly
  • Home Mountain/Resort?
    Camelback
  • Occupation?
    I teach
  • Current Boards in your Quiver
    Oxygen Proton 178, Coiler AM VSR 170, Burton FP 173/167, SG 185, Coiler NSR 183, Ogasaka RC-Z 185, Scott Strike 185
    Soft-boot: F2 Respect 176
  • Current Boots Used?
    UPZ RC-10 green (!) w/Flo liners
    Soft: Northwave Decade
  • Current bindings and set-up?
    TD3, SW and regular, 62/60, 3/6 degree front, 6 degree rear.
    Catek OS1, similar setup
    Slight outward cant on front and rear, still trying to dial it in.

    Soft: Burton C60.
  • Snowboarding since
    1979
  • Hardbooting since
    2010

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  1. Sounds great! I'll PM you
  2. Bump? Yes, bump.
  3. Anyone want to sell one of these, or a similar board for a lighter rider (120-130 lb) with narrowish waist (19 cm or less)? Looking for "modern" shape, early-rise nose etc.
  4. I'd never known there was such a thing, but met a carving skier who used to live in Aspen and rode with the purecarve crew back then -- late 90s early 2000s? He was using it and praised it.
  5. I am not any kind of engineer, but have wild ideas about putting a bunch of sensors on a board with a connection to a data-logging device. Sensors would just give relative position. The data could then be processed to give a sort of movie of board flex as it's being ridden, available to analyze any which way. Add to it some accelerometers and you could get some idea of pressure distribution, and GPS data to get an estimate of path of center of mass. Then you'd have a data set you could maybe do a lot with in terms of board response. I even looked at suppliers for sensors that might be sui
  6. Lots of photos in the for sale section! Like the 162 Kessler that @nick8228put up -- those longitudinal grooves in the base photos are structure. That pattern seems to be more common than the chevron or diagonal patterns. If your base structure is really all gone, or even just gone close to the edges, that means there's been significant base wear. It's probably worn more at the edges, so you have a slightly convex base. A grind to flat isn't going to lose much base material that matters, and will make tuning more accurate. Side-edge bevel guides use the base as reference... Before a
  7. Wow, that's impressive in so many ways. The thickness of the plastic on the lower is crazy! Why did you relocate the cuff pivot? One side only? Or is it front boot only? Why no rearward-travel spring?
  8. Great information, hknz! Deeluxe used to recommend a 26 for feet measuring at least 26 cm and up to but not including 27 cm. Measure with footbeds/orthotics you'll wear in the boots, as that often affects length. It's also usually suggested to fit your smaller foot, the idea being that the larger one will probably still fit, and if necessary that boot can be punched out to suit. Those two guidelines put you in a 26. As hknz suggests. Because Deeluxe have such a large heel/ankle area, many people attempt a smaller shell than the recommended one to get good heel hold.
  9. +1 A lift I like that's much easier than the snatch or clean and jerk is the muscle snatch. I guess it's used as warm-up for snatches. (I've seen people do essentially this with kettlebells but I never found out what they called it.) Here 130 kg is made to look easy: You're moving weight fast over a long range. As one who doesn't do Olympic lifts, I find it a nice complement to (and warm-up for) deadlifts and a good overall addition to powerlifting -style training. (My goal being health more than PRs on the Big Three).
  10. teach

    Yo Lci!!

    Really nice photos, Yamifumi! In the first one, is Mario on a snowblade mounted with TD3s? That's the "toy" reference?
  11. I have some. I think they're old style. I bought them for the older style boots but didn't use them. I'll PM you when I locate them.
  12. Where do you ride? Might be a chance someone around has shells you can try on.
  13. All Board Sports has a few pairs on ebay. Also another seller. TrueSport has some in a sweet red/orange. The North America distributor has them in "26-26.5" which is likely the shell you want (ask for the shell size or UPZ size stamped on the heel). EDIT: The Spanish board company OES (On Edge Style) has UPZ in these sizes too. You can get shell only, then find a suitable liner. Again, ask questions to get the shell size. The "UK size" on the box is the UPZ size. 7, 7.5 or 8 is probably what you want. (Older boxes call it EU size). That's the 299mm shell. I think hardboot fit i
  14. I have these in 28. You can have them for the price of shipping. PM me and I can send photos if you're interested.
  15. Mr Wonton, UPZ boots are not sized like most ski boots or alpine snowboard boots. The shells do not go up in 1 cm increments. There are various charts that attempt to convert, but they don't always agree. For example, the OP has "size 28.5" UPZ. Nowhere on the boot does it give a mondo size, so there is a conversion involved. Depending on which chart was involved, he could have the 312mm shell (UPZ sizes 8.5/9/9.5) or the 324mm shell (UPZ sizes 10/10.5/11). @lonbordingave some of the sizing charts in a post above; two of those put 28.5 as the 324mm shell. So be careful with internet
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