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queequeg

What are you doing to stop glove abuse?

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2 minutes ago, breeseomatic said:

I think the best option is to stop dragging your hand on the ground. 

 

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I don't knuckle drag, but my right hand glove always seems to wear out faster than my left hand one, probably because I'm right handed and use it more often to clip into bindings and remove snow and ice from my board and bindings. 

Dental floss repairs and liberal applications of Shoe Goo seem to be my main remedies, but I've heard good things about Sikaflex from Blue B and Carving Scooby, so I might give that a try this winter. I have also had some good success from putting strategic patches of kevlar material onto the finger tips of my Hestra gloves- I got the kevlar material from a sail maker loft here in Vancouver.

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On 10/30/2016 at 11:25 AM, Hans said:

Just buy yourself a pair of warm Level gloves with inbuild wrist protection and put some sikaflex on them, just put thin layers on it and let them drying two days in between each layer. If they start to worn, just put a new layer of Sikaflex on it. Used Thor gloves: complete rubbish by hands in the snow, not water repellant at all,  cold and they wear out pretty fast on glacier ice/hardpack (within three descents they were gone).

I've not found levels to be any more durable than any other glove, and find the wrist protection annoying. Apparently they do have a set of gloves that uses the superfabric material (I inquired with them) but if that's so it might indicate it's not that super after all (or that it wasn't used in the gloves that I tried). sikaflex seems like a better option than what I've been doing but ultimately I'd like to find a more permanent solution to this problem that doesn't involve repeatedly slathering goo all over the place.

Edited by queequeg

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On 11/2/2016 at 8:14 AM, breeseomatic said:

I think the best option is to stop dragging your hand on the ground.  Asking for a soft pliable glove that lasts a long time while being abraded by ice crystals is not a reasonable request with current technologies and market conditions.  Some snowmobile and motorcycle gloves might be built a little more burly as the intended market goes much faster and the designers build with warmth AND protection in mind. 

Not gonna happen. I enjoy getting down there, it's part of the fun for me. As long as the snow is firm enough to support my turns well I'll be dragging body parts in the snow.

Obviously I don't expect equipment to last forever. Pants rarely last more than a season for me, though jackets seem to last awhile except for the area around the hips. But an unprotected pair of gloves just seems to go in a matter of days at best.

It is totally possible to make a soft pliable glove that lasts at least half a season, it's just a matter of material selection and the right tradeoffs. Such a product doesn't exist on the market right now because the vast majority of snowsports enthisiasts have no need for such a thing, not because it can't be done (and even at a reasonable price).

Making a glove out of a somewhat-pliable material that is harder than ice-crystals is not a sky high order, it's totally doable, the market just hasn't placed much of a demand for it.

Edited by queequeg

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On 11/3/2016 at 2:13 PM, erazz said:

This is closer along the lines of what I was thinking.

I got in touch with the company that makes superfabric. I am going to experiment with using their product to augment the durability of my gloves. If all goes successfully, I might try making something that I can create in small batches for carvers, since their price-point is not prohibitive. The level gloves that do use superfabric are ski-racer specific and they have the material in all the wrong places for us carvers, so it seems that the pair of levels I had did not use it. Hopefully this stuff is as durable as they promise it is. Should be a fun project either way.

Edited by queequeg

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On 11/4/2016 at 5:04 PM, Jim Callen said:

Jose-

Why go to all that trouble when these are the best snowboard gloves known to man?

(This coming from a guy who has circulation issues)

kinco.png

I'd give these a shot but I like gloves that go over my jacket cuffs rather than under them, and I like trigger mitts.

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On 11/4/2016 at 8:04 PM, Jim Callen said:

Jose-

Why go to all that trouble when these are the best snowboard gloves known to man?

(This coming from a guy who has circulation issues)

kinco.png

I used to crack on my friend Mark for wearing those, because of this thread I have a pair curing with Nikwax cream in the basement. Im gonna give um a shot this season. Like you Jose I like over cuffs so this will be a big experiment for me. 

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33 minutes ago, queequeg said:

I said trigger mitts. These are mitts, not trigger mitts. Also I like cuffs that go over my jacket.

Just one scissor snip away :)

 

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Go to the lost and found at your local hill and ask if they have a box of unmatched mittens, gloves, etc. that they will be throwing out since no one has claimed them for at least a season.  Rummage through them and pick out every one that fits, regardless of how ugly it is.  Sort them rights and lefts, and then pair them up as well as possible.  Don't worry that you burn through a pair a week, or that one wears out faster than another - they don't match anyway.    

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You often see the park rat kids not wearing gloves during the spring. Exercising the "skate" feeling I assume. Last year I did a full afternoon on plates without gloves at all. Something I would recommend everyone try even if only one run. It will tell you very quickly how much "outrigger" you are actually using...

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Hexarmor makes a huge range of Superfabric gloves that seem very promising. I got a good deal on a pair of these on Bay:

https://www.hexarmor.com/products/arctic-mitt-4050

The palms look like they'll last through anything I can put them through, and the back of the hand has some rubber "armor" on it. The only weak point seems to be the cuff, which is quite thin, but the palm extends down pretty far. They have a removable fleece inner glove, so they should dry very quickly if they're not highly waterproof. Definitely a cold weather glove.

Every leather glove I've used ends up with holes in it before too long, so I'm never going back to those.

I also got a pair of these as an experiment, inspired by the long oven-mitt style EC gloves I've seen:

https://www.hexarmor.com/products/hercules-r6e

The fabric itself is waterproof, but the seams aren't. I'm going to take care of that with some silicone RTV and see how they do. Zero insulation, but I got XLs for my M/L hands so I can fit a heavy waterproof liner glove inside. I wouldn't hesitate to use these for Coleman slides on tarmac, so I think they should last forever on any kind of snow.

Their long-cuff Ugly Mudder gloves would probably be the best thing on earth for this purpose (with a liner inside), but the appearance is just a bit too much for me.

 

 

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On 11/20/2016 at 6:27 AM, charliekarr said:

Hexarmor makes a huge range of Superfabric gloves that seem very promising. I got a good deal on a pair of these on Bay:

https://www.hexarmor.com/products/arctic-mitt-4050

The palms look like they'll last through anything I can put them through, and the back of the hand has some rubber "armor" on it. The only weak point seems to be the cuff, which is quite thin, but the palm extends down pretty far. They have a removable fleece inner glove, so they should dry very quickly if they're not highly waterproof. Definitely a cold weather glove.

Every leather glove I've used ends up with holes in it before too long, so I'm never going back to those.

I also got a pair of these as an experiment, inspired by the long oven-mitt style EC gloves I've seen:

https://www.hexarmor.com/products/hercules-r6e

The fabric itself is waterproof, but the seams aren't. I'm going to take care of that with some silicone RTV and see how they do. Zero insulation, but I got XLs for my M/L hands so I can fit a heavy waterproof liner glove inside. I wouldn't hesitate to use these for Coleman slides on tarmac, so I think they should last forever on any kind of snow.

Their long-cuff Ugly Mudder gloves would probably be the best thing on earth for this purpose (with a liner inside), but the appearance is just a bit too much for me.

 

 

Nice Find — so you've put some days on them and they are holding up? This is sort of along the lines of what I was looking for.

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I am with you Jose, I hate getting snow under my outer wear and prefer a glove that goes over my jacket cuff.  A main reason why I wear bibs...keeps the snow out!

Thor gloves are the best for me and a lot of other carvers.  Lasts for multiple seasons.  I usually wear super cheap stretch gloves you can find everywhere as a liner and good to go!  I am sure most people wish they made a mitt or trigger mitt, maybe some day...

http://www.texasmusicnews.net/THOR.htm

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On 11/19/2016 at 9:27 PM, charliekarr said:

Hexarmor makes a huge range of Superfabric gloves that seem very promising. I got a good deal on a pair of these on Bay:

https://www.hexarmor.com/products/arctic-mitt-4050

The palms look like they'll last through anything I can put them through, and the back of the hand has some rubber "armor" on it. The only weak point seems to be the cuff, which is quite thin, but the palm extends down pretty far. They have a removable fleece inner glove, so they should dry very quickly if they're not highly waterproof. Definitely a cold weather glove.

Every leather glove I've used ends up with holes in it before too long, so I'm never going back to those.

I also got a pair of these as an experiment, inspired by the long oven-mitt style EC gloves I've seen:

https://www.hexarmor.com/products/hercules-r6e

The fabric itself is waterproof, but the seams aren't. I'm going to take care of that with some silicone RTV and see how they do. Zero insulation, but I got XLs for my M/L hands so I can fit a heavy waterproof liner glove inside. I wouldn't hesitate to use these for Coleman slides on tarmac, so I think they should last forever on any kind of snow.

Their long-cuff Ugly Mudder gloves would probably be the best thing on earth for this purpose (with a liner inside), but the appearance is just a bit too much for me.

 

 

 Interested in those mitts. Have you received them yet? How do they feel? Let us know how they hold up too!

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Hmmm.............................what's the price on the Hexarmor Arctic and Hercules model??

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Acoustic B and Ace - All those options look very interesting - I look forward to seing an update when you put them to the test

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The Hexarmor mitts are WARM. Highly recommended, especially if you can get a good price (try ebay). The fleece liner is thick and it's velcro'd in place to the shell. Dexterity is ok, but not great due to the thickness and semi-mitt design. But I can still grab an Intec handle through my pants without much trouble, let alone adjusting boots and flipping TD3 toe levers.

The Hercules gauntlets are now fully waterproof, and a bit uglier after sealing the seams. Definitely not as warm, but probably a good choice for spring when combined with a liner. I tend to run very hot, so these may be good enough for me during the normal season.

Either way, I really like the idea of a separable inner and outer glove, because I will no longer have a waterlogged glove that's *mostly* waterproof and refuses to dry. Waking up to not-quite-dry gloves is hopefully a thing of the past.

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